Dishing up a ‘miracle meal’


First Presbyterian Church offers its traditional Thanksgiving meal

By Alice Craig - For The Record-Herald



Finally by mid-morning Thanksgiving Day, it’s time to dish up the meal. At the kitchen’s large center island, 5-6 pairs stand across from each other—with large roaster pans of food between them—to scoop and then pass down the individual food containers in an assembly-line operation. Shown here are (from left) Diana Melchiori, Caitlyn Booth, Dean Myers, Nancy Crouse, Gypsy Myers, Becky Bloomer and Joshua Pickelheimer.

Finally by mid-morning Thanksgiving Day, it’s time to dish up the meal. At the kitchen’s large center island, 5-6 pairs stand across from each other—with large roaster pans of food between them—to scoop and then pass down the individual food containers in an assembly-line operation. Shown here are (from left) Diana Melchiori, Caitlyn Booth, Dean Myers, Nancy Crouse, Gypsy Myers, Becky Bloomer and Joshua Pickelheimer.


Photos courtesy of Alice Craig

While Jennifer Pieratt’s husband, Tom, handles the logistics of which driver would deliver how many dinners to which addresses around Fayette County (and he supplies a county map to each driver), Sara Creamer keeps tabs on the number of “cold bags” needed. She is pictured here in the Persinger Hall dining room, counting tables full of these bags, which contain slices of cake, scoops of cranberry salad, plastic tableware and small bottles of water. First Presbyterian makes an effort to “purchase green” (i.e., recyclable plastic and paper products).


Photos courtesy of Alice Craig

After the COVID-19 interruption in 2020, First Presbyterian Church of Washington C.H. once again on Thanksgiving Day 2021 offered its “Miracle Meal”: traditional hot dinners with all the trimmings.

Recipients were county residents on the Commission on Aging’s “Meals on Wheels” lists as well as shut-ins suggested by various local churches.

Such a project counts on some members baking pumpkin cakes with delicious frosting at home, other members showing up in the church kitchen on the day before to prepare cranberry salads, and even more members arriving on the morning of Thanksgiving Day to complete the many final tasks. (Jennifer Pieratt and Debra Grover started Thursday at 5 a.m. to roast 12 turkeys in the church’s 12 roaster pans in Persinger Hall in outlets guaranteed not to blow a fuse.)

Finally by mid-morning Thanksgiving Day, it’s time to dish up the meal. At the kitchen’s large center island, 5-6 pairs stand across from each other—with large roaster pans of food between them—to scoop and then pass down the individual food containers in an assembly-line operation. Shown here are (from left) Diana Melchiori, Caitlyn Booth, Dean Myers, Nancy Crouse, Gypsy Myers, Becky Bloomer and Joshua Pickelheimer.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2021/11/web1_PHOTO-ONE-IMG_2394-T-G-Day-2021-Diana-Caty-B-Dean-Myers-Nancy-C-Gypsy-Myers-Becky-Bloomer-Josh-P-1-.jpgFinally by mid-morning Thanksgiving Day, it’s time to dish up the meal. At the kitchen’s large center island, 5-6 pairs stand across from each other—with large roaster pans of food between them—to scoop and then pass down the individual food containers in an assembly-line operation. Shown here are (from left) Diana Melchiori, Caitlyn Booth, Dean Myers, Nancy Crouse, Gypsy Myers, Becky Bloomer and Joshua Pickelheimer. Photos courtesy of Alice Craig

While Jennifer Pieratt’s husband, Tom, handles the logistics of which driver would deliver how many dinners to which addresses around Fayette County (and he supplies a county map to each driver), Sara Creamer keeps tabs on the number of “cold bags” needed. She is pictured here in the Persinger Hall dining room, counting tables full of these bags, which contain slices of cake, scoops of cranberry salad, plastic tableware and small bottles of water. First Presbyterian makes an effort to “purchase green” (i.e., recyclable plastic and paper products).
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2021/11/web1_PHOTO-4-T-G-Day-2021-Sara-Creamer-counts-meal-bags-1-.jpgWhile Jennifer Pieratt’s husband, Tom, handles the logistics of which driver would deliver how many dinners to which addresses around Fayette County (and he supplies a county map to each driver), Sara Creamer keeps tabs on the number of “cold bags” needed. She is pictured here in the Persinger Hall dining room, counting tables full of these bags, which contain slices of cake, scoops of cranberry salad, plastic tableware and small bottles of water. First Presbyterian makes an effort to “purchase green” (i.e., recyclable plastic and paper products). Photos courtesy of Alice Craig
First Presbyterian Church offers its traditional Thanksgiving meal

By Alice Craig

For The Record-Herald