Final market held for 2021


By Jennifer Woods - jwoods@aimmediamidwest.com



The 21st Fayette County Farmers’ Market has officially ended, with plans to be back next year.

The 21st Fayette County Farmers’ Market has officially ended, with plans to be back next year.


Jennifer Woods | Record-Herald photos

Jane Ann Teeters of Cute as a Button sold various items including button earrings, aprons, clothespin bags, crocheted and fabric purses, and children’s clothing.


Jennifer Woods | Record-Herald photos

Nancy Cutter of Cozy Baby Blessings was a regular vendor throughout the season, often selling hand poured wax melts, handmade earrings, crochet dish cloths and pot scrubbers, and handmade baby essentials including crocheted baby blankets and hats, flannel burp cloths, crinkle toys, infant bows and teethers.


Jennifer Woods | Record-Herald photos

Bruce and Marlene Chilcote of Chilcote Farm often has special goodies for customers to purchase — such as Texas sheet cakes, white Texas sheet cakes, zucchini bread, pumpkin bread and pecan pie bars.


Jennifer Woods | Record-Herald photos

Hunter and Lorelle Rohrer of Bridge View Garden (740-505-5125) often sold Mums, red raspberries, sweet potatoes, potatoes, tomatoes, zucchini and yellow summer squash. Pictured with them is local customer Kelly Herd, who frequented the market and enjoyed speaking to several vendors on a regular basis.


Jennifer Woods | Record-Herald photos

Katrina Bush of Greens & Greenery, along with providing plenty of advice on plants for those interested, often sold beeswax hand and cuticle creams, glycerin and honey soap, broom corn wreaths and stalks for decorating, sourdough crackers, among several other items such as garlic/turmeric, rosemary and parmesan.


Jennifer Woods | Record-Herald photos

Saturday was the final Fayette County Farmers Market of 2021 with cool, fall weather and plenty of attendees to close out its 21st year of existence.

The Saturday market was held throughout the season in the municipal parking lot on the corner of South Main and East East streets in Washington Court House. The parking lot was filled with vendors selling the remainder of their plants, flowers, homemade crafts, etc. and saying thank yous to long-time and newly met customers.

The market was held every Saturday morning from 8:30 to noon from May 8 through Sept. 25.

Katrina Bush, who also participated at the market as a vendor, regularly submitted articles to the Record-Herald throughout the season to keep the community updated on what would be happening that week at the Saturday market.

David Persinger, the market manager since 2010 and vendor since 2017, provided weekly updates to Record-Herald readers for the Wednesday market, held in the parking lot of TSC. The Wednesday market ended for the year earlier this month.

Having a local market allows certain benefits to be enjoyed by the community — aside from unique products that can’t be bought in chain stores.

Those using SNAP EBT food benefit cards were able to receive matching dollar “Produce Perks” tokens ($1 for $1) good only for fruits, vegetables, and food producing plants. So, they were able to “buy one, get one” for up to $25 every market day, and those tokens will remain valid for next year. Five dollar coupons were also available throughout the season for Fayette County Farm Bureau members.

This season, the Fayette County Farmers Market celebrated its 21st year, having started in the summer of 2001.

As previously reported and according to Persinger and the market’s website, the very first local market appeared in 2001 after having been organized by Carol Sowers who, at the time, was a part of the local OSU Extension Office, and Sowers was assisted by Brad Bergefurd who, at that time, was part of the Piketon OSU Extension Office.

The first few markets were held in the parking lot of the local extension office.

“In the ensuing years, others from the local Extension Office organized the yearly market including but not limited to Christie Wilt, Tyler Brown, Linda Morgan, Kim Stover and the Master Gardeners of Fayette County,” explains the market’s website.

In 2007, the market then moved to its current location in the city parking lot in Washington C.H. Then, in 2010, participating vendors formed a cooperative association to operate the market.

A new backdrop that will join next year’s season is an agriculture-focused mural now located on the side of the Kiger and Kiger building facing the parking lot where the farmers market is held. Follow the Record-Herald for more information on the ribbon cutting held for this special addition.

Reach journalist Jennifer Woods at 740-313-0355.

The 21st Fayette County Farmers’ Market has officially ended, with plans to be back next year.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2021/09/web1_LastFarmersMarket-4-.jpgThe 21st Fayette County Farmers’ Market has officially ended, with plans to be back next year. Jennifer Woods | Record-Herald photos

Jane Ann Teeters of Cute as a Button sold various items including button earrings, aprons, clothespin bags, crocheted and fabric purses, and children’s clothing.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2021/09/web1_LastFarmersMarket-7-.jpgJane Ann Teeters of Cute as a Button sold various items including button earrings, aprons, clothespin bags, crocheted and fabric purses, and children’s clothing. Jennifer Woods | Record-Herald photos

Nancy Cutter of Cozy Baby Blessings was a regular vendor throughout the season, often selling hand poured wax melts, handmade earrings, crochet dish cloths and pot scrubbers, and handmade baby essentials including crocheted baby blankets and hats, flannel burp cloths, crinkle toys, infant bows and teethers.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2021/09/web1_LastFarmersMarket-2-.jpgNancy Cutter of Cozy Baby Blessings was a regular vendor throughout the season, often selling hand poured wax melts, handmade earrings, crochet dish cloths and pot scrubbers, and handmade baby essentials including crocheted baby blankets and hats, flannel burp cloths, crinkle toys, infant bows and teethers. Jennifer Woods | Record-Herald photos

Bruce and Marlene Chilcote of Chilcote Farm often has special goodies for customers to purchase — such as Texas sheet cakes, white Texas sheet cakes, zucchini bread, pumpkin bread and pecan pie bars.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2021/09/web1_LastFarmersMarket-3-.jpgBruce and Marlene Chilcote of Chilcote Farm often has special goodies for customers to purchase — such as Texas sheet cakes, white Texas sheet cakes, zucchini bread, pumpkin bread and pecan pie bars. Jennifer Woods | Record-Herald photos

Hunter and Lorelle Rohrer of Bridge View Garden (740-505-5125) often sold Mums, red raspberries, sweet potatoes, potatoes, tomatoes, zucchini and yellow summer squash. Pictured with them is local customer Kelly Herd, who frequented the market and enjoyed speaking to several vendors on a regular basis.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2021/09/web1_LastFarmersMarket-8-.jpgHunter and Lorelle Rohrer of Bridge View Garden (740-505-5125) often sold Mums, red raspberries, sweet potatoes, potatoes, tomatoes, zucchini and yellow summer squash. Pictured with them is local customer Kelly Herd, who frequented the market and enjoyed speaking to several vendors on a regular basis. Jennifer Woods | Record-Herald photos

Katrina Bush of Greens & Greenery, along with providing plenty of advice on plants for those interested, often sold beeswax hand and cuticle creams, glycerin and honey soap, broom corn wreaths and stalks for decorating, sourdough crackers, among several other items such as garlic/turmeric, rosemary and parmesan.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2021/09/web1_LastFarmersMarket-1-.jpgKatrina Bush of Greens & Greenery, along with providing plenty of advice on plants for those interested, often sold beeswax hand and cuticle creams, glycerin and honey soap, broom corn wreaths and stalks for decorating, sourdough crackers, among several other items such as garlic/turmeric, rosemary and parmesan. Jennifer Woods | Record-Herald photos

By Jennifer Woods

jwoods@aimmediamidwest.com