Oktoberfest at St. Colman to return Oct. 2


Staff reports



2021 Oktoberfest volunteers Jana Deeks (left) and Patty Griffiths (right) place yard signs promoting the event’s return. The event is free and open to everyone.

2021 Oktoberfest volunteers Jana Deeks (left) and Patty Griffiths (right) place yard signs promoting the event’s return. The event is free and open to everyone.


Courtesy photo

“Oktoberfest” will soon be returning for the fourth year at St. Colman Parish in Washington Court House — and the public is invited for the fun.

The annual event is planned for Saturday, Oct. 2 from 2-10 p.m. at the Parish, located at 219 S. North St. in Washington Court House.

There will be food, music, activities and a large charitable raffle with proceeds to benefit the festival and local charities. Admission is free.

One of the activities will be a cornhole tournament. A two-person team must be registered to take part, and the tournament is open to anyone and everyone just as all other activities are. Registration for the tournament is $20 with 12 teams max. It will be double elimination with a cash prize for first, second and third place. The tournament is scheduled to begin at 3 p.m. on Oct. 2.

There will also be a “Beer Tray Relay,” and Stein Hoisting competitions for both men and women.

Follow the Facebook event page, “Fayette County Oktoberfest at St. Colman” for more information as the event draws closer.

History of Oktoberfest

Bavarian Crown Prince Ludwig (who later became King Ludwig I), married Princess Therese of Saxony-Hildburghausen on Oct. 12, 1810. Shortly afterwards, the groom’s father announced that in five days hence, a large reception would take place on the fields in front of the city gates, to celebrate the happy royal event. The field was then named Theresienwiese, “Theresa’s fields,” in honor of the Crown Princess. The locals sometimes call it the “Wies’n,” or more commonly today — “Wiesn.”

The long interim between the wedding and reception was to allow bakeries to bake extra bread and for the other food purveyors a chance to set up their operations. All 40,000 residents were invited, and it would be a city holiday. Everyone was asked to wear their Sunday best – no lederhosen would be permitted.

And so this wedding celebration in the officially Roman Catholic kingdom of Bavaria became an annual event. (Notably, the Princess Bride was Lutheran. It being an arranged marriage intended to create allegiance that would expand the kingdom). Even today, the modern German state of Bavaria remains the most Catholic part of Germany.

Subsequently, this ultimate Catholic wedding reception became an annual event with its heart in Munich, Bavaria (now a state in modern Germany). Lederhosen and dirndls have become acceptable attire, although they are often more ornately decorated than simple workwear.

“We hope you’ll come and join in the gemütlichkeit at St. Colman,” explained event officials.

Information in this article was provided by event officials.

2021 Oktoberfest volunteers Jana Deeks (left) and Patty Griffiths (right) place yard signs promoting the event’s return. The event is free and open to everyone.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2021/09/web1_thumbnail_Yard-Sign.jpg2021 Oktoberfest volunteers Jana Deeks (left) and Patty Griffiths (right) place yard signs promoting the event’s return. The event is free and open to everyone. Courtesy photo

Staff reports