Rotary assists with disc golf course


Raffle to be held for framed OSU alumni autographed photos

Staff reports



Pictured is the framed collection being raffled off by the Washington Court House Rotary.

Pictured is the framed collection being raffled off by the Washington Court House Rotary.


Courtesy photo

To financially assist the creation of a local disc golf course, the Washington Court House Rotary is having a raffle for a framed collection of autographed photos of Ohio State alumni: Archie Griffin, Jerry Lucas and Jack Nicklaus.

Tickets for the raffle are $10 each. The number of tickets available are limited as there will be a maximum of 250 tickets sold.

The drawing will be held on July 27, and the presentation to the winner will be made by Jerry Lucas on Aug. 10 at the weekly Rotary meeting.

The meeting will begin at 11:30 a.m. at the Crown Room at the Rusty Keg in Washington Court House. While the public is invited to this event/meeting, those interested in attending must RSVP due to limited seating, and the cost of the meal must be paid for by Aug. 3. The cost is $15.

To pay for the event and RSVP, please contact Beth McCane at 740-333-3434 or Angie Mellott at 614-554-7751.

Proceeds from the raffle will go toward the new disc golf course that is currently being developed.

According to www.discgolf.com/, “Disc golf is similar to traditional golf; however, instead of using golf clubs and balls aiming for a hole, disc golf players use disc golf discs and aim for a disc golf basket which is a pole extending up from the ground with chains and a basket where the disc lands. The object of the game is to complete each hole in the fewest number of throws, starting from a tee area and finishing with the disc coming to rest in the basket.”

Courses can be various and have grown in popularity. Currently, there are no courses within the city limits.

The website www.discgolf.com/ further explains, “Generally, a course is made up of 9 or 18 holes. Players start at hole one and complete the course in order, playing through to the last hole. The player with the lowest total cumulative throws wins. Disc golf differs from traditional golf in important ways. Disc golf courses can use a wide variety of terrain. Often times, land not suitable for other park activities or development is the perfect terrain for a disc golf course.”

Not only can disc golf courses be located in areas not suitable for other activities, it can be enjoyed by many people that may have trouble with other physical activity.

According to Rotary member Beth McCane, the new disc golf course being built within the city is being “spearheaded” by local Jason Stritenberger with the park district.

The course is planned to go behind the water treatment plant and Washington Cemetery off a stretch of trail where nothing is currently located.

McCane explained, “it’ll go clear back into the woods, almost near where the bridge is, (Stritenberger told us).”

Stritenberger owns a newer shop called Death Putt Disc Supply, located at 149 S. Fayette St. As previously reported, prior to opening his shop, Stritenberger sold disc golf supplies out of a nook at Court House Customs as he was one of the owners of Court House Customs.

Items for sale include various discs, disc golf baskets, carts, bags, accessories and wearable merchandise. Those who want to try out the activity but are new to it can stop into the shop for advice.

Pictured is the framed collection being raffled off by the Washington Court House Rotary.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2021/07/web1_Image.jpegPictured is the framed collection being raffled off by the Washington Court House Rotary. Courtesy photo
Raffle to be held for framed OSU alumni autographed photos

Staff reports