‘Drug Take Back’ a success


By Martin Graham - mgraham@recordherald.com



The Fayette County Sheriff’s Office (FCSO) held a Drug Take Back Day at the FCSO Annex on Saturday where around 68 pounds of medication was collected. Pictured (L to R): FCSO Deputy Brian Crooks, Sheriff Vernon Stanforth and Sgt. Jon Fausnaugh.

The Fayette County Sheriff’s Office (FCSO) held a Drug Take Back Day at the FCSO Annex on Saturday where around 68 pounds of medication was collected. Pictured (L to R): FCSO Deputy Brian Crooks, Sheriff Vernon Stanforth and Sgt. Jon Fausnaugh.


Courtesy photo

Over the weekend, the Fayette County Sheriff’s Office (FCSO) and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) offered an opportunity for the public to take part in another Drug Take Back Day at the FCSO Annex.

According to Prevention Co-coordinator of the Community Action Commission of Fayette County Gwen Hesson, there were a total of 39 drop-offs with around 68 pounds of medication to be collected by the DEA.

“We are very proud of our community for their participation in this event,” Hesson wrote on Monday via email. “We were up against a code red status for the county regarding COVID-19, an OSU football game and a TRUMP rally to be taking place in the Circleville area. There were concerns that we may not see the numbers that we are used to. However, the support was felt and much appreciated. We thank everyone that participated either through their drop off items or the hours volunteered to make this event happen.”

Hesson also wanted to remind the community that there will be another DEA Drug Take Back Day in April of next year. She also mentioned that there is a drop box located at the FCSO where prescriptions and other medications can be disposed of. The newest drop box is located at Fayette County Memorial Hospital in the lobby area and available during the standard business hours at the hospital.

As previously reported, this initiative addresses a vital public safety and public health issue, according to authorities. Medicines that are left in home cabinets are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse and abuse. Rates of prescription drug abuse in the U.S. are alarmingly high, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdoses due to these drugs, authorities said.

Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet. In addition, Americans are now advised that their usual methods for disposing of unused medicines—flushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash—both pose potential safety and health hazards.

According to www.getsmartaboutdrugs.gov/, “The October 2019 Take Back Day brought in 882,919 pounds (almost 442 tons) of unused or expired medication and vape devices. This brings the total amount of prescription drugs collected since the fall of 2010 to nearly 12.7 million pounds.”

The information in this article was provided by Prevention Co-coordinator of the Community Action Commission of Fayette County Gwen Hesson and the Fayette County Sheriff’s Office.

Reach Martin Graham on Twitter @MartiTheNewsGuy.

The Fayette County Sheriff’s Office (FCSO) held a Drug Take Back Day at the FCSO Annex on Saturday where around 68 pounds of medication was collected. Pictured (L to R): FCSO Deputy Brian Crooks, Sheriff Vernon Stanforth and Sgt. Jon Fausnaugh.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2020/10/web1_DEA-Drug-Take-Back-10.24.20.jpgThe Fayette County Sheriff’s Office (FCSO) held a Drug Take Back Day at the FCSO Annex on Saturday where around 68 pounds of medication was collected. Pictured (L to R): FCSO Deputy Brian Crooks, Sheriff Vernon Stanforth and Sgt. Jon Fausnaugh. Courtesy photo

By Martin Graham

mgraham@recordherald.com