FRHS surpasses 1,000 adoptions


‘Luke’ becomes one of newest animals in FRHS care

By Jennifer Woods - jwoods@aimmediamidwest.com



Luke was recently brought to the Fayette Regional Humane Society all the way from Adams County. He had a large abscess on his face. Once he is fully healed, Luke will become one of the other 1,042 animals that have been adopted out to new homes by FRHS so far this year.

Luke was recently brought to the Fayette Regional Humane Society all the way from Adams County. He had a large abscess on his face. Once he is fully healed, Luke will become one of the other 1,042 animals that have been adopted out to new homes by FRHS so far this year.


Courtesy photo

Fayette Regional Humane Society (FRHS) recently exceeded 1,000 adoptions this year.

To be exact, the adoptions currently total 1,042 animals that have found a new home, and adoptions will continue as the year goes on, according to FRHS Chief Humane Agent and Outreach Director Brad Adams.

Of those 1,042 animals, there were 929 cats, 96 dogs, two pigs, three rabbits, 11 guinea pigs and one chicken, according to Adams.

One of the animals that recently came into the care of FRHS and will eventually become one of the animals to find a home is a cat named “Luke.”

Luke is originally from Adams County.

He came into the care of FRHS after a “caring person” traveled 45 miles as they knew how many animals FRHS helps, according to Adams.

Luke had a large abscess on his face. Following treatment, he has been healing well.

“Once Luke’s wound is all healed up, he will be ready to steal someone’s heart and be a part of a family,” said Adams.

Luke isn’t the only animal to be brought from outside the county and taken to FRHS for care.

According to FRHS Executive Director Lee Schrader, animals come to the FRHS from all over southern Ohio while adopters travel from all over the country, including New York and Minnesota.

Although many cats come in as strays, there is another program that many cats (and dogs) come to FRHS through. That program is the FRHS Puppy and Kitten Parent Program. It offers low-cost spay and neuter for pet parents while the kittens and puppies enter the FRHS adoption program.

Regardless of how an animal comes into the care of FRHS, each animal is checked for physical and emotional health, vaccinated, dewormed, microchipped, and spayed or neutered.

Although most of the animals are adopted from the FRHS downtown shelter, located at 153 S. Main St. in Washington Court House, many cats and kittens are adopted out by the FRHS adoption partners. Those partners are the PetSmart store in Beavercreek and the PetCo store in Chillicothe.

“Our Adoption Program gives a second chance to hundreds of cats, dogs and other animals every year,” explained Schrader. “We have a live release rate of 96 percent, which means that an animal in our adoption program has a 96 percent chance of leaving the shelter and going to a loving home. This live release rate is considered ‘no-kill,’ and it puts us in a very elite group of shelters nationwide.”

Aside from providing adoption services, FRHS offers other services including a low-cost clinic to income-qualifying pet owners, a trap-neuter-return (TNR) program, and Humane Law Enforcement.

“The cost of preparing all these animals for adoption is not covered by adoption fees, so we are very grateful for compassionate and caring people who believe that every animal deserves a chance for a life where they are happy, safe and loved,” explained Schrader.

To learn more or to stay updated on FRHS, visit its petfinder page at www.petfinder.com/member/us/oh/washington-court-house/fayette-humane-society-oh248/, it’s website located at www.fayetteregionalhumane.org/, and its Facebook page, “Fayette Regional Humane Society.”

Reach journalist Jennifer Woods at 740-463-1225 or on Twitter @JennMWoods.

Luke was recently brought to the Fayette Regional Humane Society all the way from Adams County. He had a large abscess on his face. Once he is fully healed, Luke will become one of the other 1,042 animals that have been adopted out to new homes by FRHS so far this year.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2020/09/web1_20200911_104725001.jpgLuke was recently brought to the Fayette Regional Humane Society all the way from Adams County. He had a large abscess on his face. Once he is fully healed, Luke will become one of the other 1,042 animals that have been adopted out to new homes by FRHS so far this year. Courtesy photo
‘Luke’ becomes one of newest animals in FRHS care

By Jennifer Woods

jwoods@aimmediamidwest.com