‘A rollercoaster ride living in the hell of heroin’


Adam’s Hope created for Greenfield family that tried to help

By Amber Beavers - For The Times-Gazette



Adam’s Hope participants walk down Jefferson Street in Greenfield last Saturday.

Adam’s Hope participants walk down Jefferson Street in Greenfield last Saturday.


Courtesy photos

Amber Beavers (right) is pictured with her mother, Sandy Meyers.


Courtesy photos

Editor’s note — The following was written by Amber Beavers, who lost a brother, Adam Myers, to a drug overdose in 2019. Last Saturday the second Adam’s Hope event was held in Greenfield.

To face tough problems and to effect real change, you have to be willing to be real. On the street it’s called being 100. For real, for real. You have to be honest and lay the truth bare. This is the story of my brother, Adam.

Adam Myers was born in Greenfield in 1994. He was the cutest little chubby kid you ever saw! Growing up he enjoyed all the things that boys do. He had friends, played baseball and football, wrestled, hunted and fished and enjoyed the freedom and fun of small-town life. Adam was quick with a smile and full of life. He had a twinkle in his eye that you really couldn’t miss when you met him.

Adam partied in high school. He had tried alcohol and pot and had fun with the country boys most of his high school years. But it was when Adam was 19 that his life was altered forever. At just 19, Adam was at a party and tried heroin for the first time. This was a decision with an impact bigger and more powerful than he could ever imagine. Up until this point, Adam had lived life on his terms. With one decision, the tables were turned. He was not in control from this point forward. For the next seven years heroin called the shots. Two stints in rehab, jail sentences, Suboxone, Vivitrol, seven overdoses with Narcan, and finally a ventilator. Seven years of a rollercoaster ride living in the hell of heroin that eventually cost him his life.

In May 2017, Adam came home and was staying with me. I reached out to Robert Arthurs, who was building a new gym (in Greenfield) at the time to see if he had something Adam could do to keep him busy. Idle time is not good for an addict. Without knowing it, a simple job turned into a relationship that, to be honest, probably kept Adam alive. Adam was sober from May of 2017 until about a week before his death. He passed away on April 14, 2019 from a fatal drug overdose.

We have gathered bits and pieces since that time. My family has more questions than answers. We are forever grateful, though, for the Arthurs family for giving Adam a chance. He was proud of himself for the first time in a long time. He was able to buy a car, mended relationships, gained back trust, got really good at drywall and was living life. We were able to make good, clean memories with him for the first time in a long time. We miss him more than we can put into words. To the world, Adam was an addict, a throw away. But, like so many others who struggle with addiction, he was more than that.

Adam’s Hope was created shortly after the loss of my brother to do what Robert Arthurs did — step in and be a difference to someone who needs it.

Adam was a son, a brother, an uncle, a nephew, and a friend, His sense of humor was one of a kind and his smile could light up a room. Adam’s Hope was created to help others in need of treatment and to offer support to families who feel like they have no one to talk to and nowhere to turn. Maybe their loved one relapsed again, maybe someone needs help getting into treatment, or maybe there is just no way to cope with the culture of addiction. Maybe they face just too many unanswered questions.

Our second walk for Adam’s Hope happened this past Saturday, Aug. 29. What a wonderful turnout we had! We started at the new Community Action building in Greenfield, walked to the center of town and ended up at Small Town Fitness, where Robert and Carolyn Arthurs first offered Adam help. Over 130 people participated and over $600 was raised to help those that need services like transportation to rehab centers, books and materials for counseling, hygiene products, and other services provided by counseling centers.

Inspirational testimonies and talks were given by Tyler Pack of Washington C.H., Chad Helm of Kentucky, Laken Woods of Greenfield/Chillicothe, and Jennifer Forsha of Greenfield/Washington C.H., all brave, recovering addicts, and all with a message of hope and encouragement that people do recover.

Adam’s Hope could be more and do more, but for now it’s just going where God leads. We would like to thank those who participated and donated to this humble cause and thank the community for the outpouring of love and support.

I want no one to forget about my brother, Adam, and the fun-loving guy he was. Adam’s Hope’s mission will serve to keep his memory alive as it provides hope for the addict community. And remember: “Our greatest glory is not in never failing, but in rising up every time we fail.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

With everlasting hope…

Adam’s Hope participants walk down Jefferson Street in Greenfield last Saturday.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2020/09/web1_AdamsHope-pic-1.jpgAdam’s Hope participants walk down Jefferson Street in Greenfield last Saturday. Courtesy photos

Amber Beavers (right) is pictured with her mother, Sandy Meyers.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2020/09/web1_AdamsHope-pic-2.jpgAmber Beavers (right) is pictured with her mother, Sandy Meyers. Courtesy photos
Adam’s Hope created for Greenfield family that tried to help

By Amber Beavers

For The Times-Gazette