Creative trends provide a little happiness


By Jennifer Woods and Martin Graham - Record-Herald Staff Writers



Sue Shope (left) explained that her young neighbor, Trinity (right), serves as inspiration for wanting to make kids smile. One way to do this, according to Shope, is by coming together as a community to give kids a creative and fun activity to do such as “hunting” stuffed animals and eggs in windows.

Sue Shope (left) explained that her young neighbor, Trinity (right), serves as inspiration for wanting to make kids smile. One way to do this, according to Shope, is by coming together as a community to give kids a creative and fun activity to do such as “hunting” stuffed animals and eggs in windows.


Courtesy photo

As the community deals with self-isolating and practices social distancing due to the spread of the coronavirus, some are considering others by trying to bring a little happiness to Fayette County with some stuffing and crafts.

On social media, two unique trends have developed.

One of those trends involves several sightings of cuddly, stuffed animals as residents are taking time to place a toy in a window for children to see.

The idea behind this trend is families can get outside for some fresh air while working on counting skills by keeping track of the number of animals seen, recognizing what type of animal the toy is, and teaching observation skills.

Initially, this trend was focused on using stuffed bears during a “bear hunt.” Many local residents have branched out to other toys, especially if they do not have any bears to use.

To participate, community members or businesses can simply place stuffed animals in one or more windows that are visible from the road. This will allow children to see and count the animals while ensuring a safe distance.

Local resident Sue Shope created a document and shared it on social media encouraging citizens of the City of Washington Court House to join in this trend. Several others jumped on board, including people located outside city limits and in different villages.

Shope explained in a message, “I think (hope) the community gets involved, because the world is getting bad and sad news daily now. More and more this sad news is affecting each of us in one way or another. If the virus hasn’t affected our lives directly, then the worry it has caused is affecting us.”

“Kids don’t understand how dangerous this is right now,” she explained. “They went from going to school and being normal kids to ordered to stay home and not be able to hang out with their friends and not to even be out shopping. Children are the most innocent in this world. They are scared of the unknown.”

According to Shope, the reason she is taking part in this trend is for her young neighbor, Trinity.

“She gave me the inspiration to make a child smile,” wrote Shope. “Every kid I know loves teddy bears. The bears provide a comfort to them. By us, as a community, putting the teddy bears in our windows, we are showing the children that we are together in this, and we are sending them our love. It also gives a chance for the kids to go around counting to see how many they find. They can vote their favorite bear/stuffed animal. Parents can also make a day that they count certain colors of the animals they find. They can do so many activities with this idea and give their kids a chance to incorporate knowledge at the same time. It is just a simple, small chance to share love in the world today.”

The second trend joining the stuffed animals is the creation of large, colorful eggs that are then placed in windows. These eggs should also be visible from the street. Similar to the stuffed animals, it would allow families to count, observe and have fun while getting fresh air. Unlike the stuffed animals, people of all ages can have fun creating the eggs.

Imara Caldwell, a local mother of four boys ranging from 1 to 10 years old, requested on social media for everyone who can to join in and create their own eggs for the window egg hunt. She plans to make them with her kids on Sunday.

“My kiddos love the huge egg hunts and are going to be bummed when they realize we can’t go,” she explained.

One way to substitute for the large gatherings is by having many people take part so kids can hunt for them throughout their communities while still following social distancing.

Caldwell wrote, “Let’s do this Fayco!”

Reach Jennifer Woods at 740-313-0355 or on Twitter @JennMWoods.

Sue Shope (left) explained that her young neighbor, Trinity (right), serves as inspiration for wanting to make kids smile. One way to do this, according to Shope, is by coming together as a community to give kids a creative and fun activity to do such as “hunting” stuffed animals and eggs in windows.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2020/03/web1_trinityShope.jpgSue Shope (left) explained that her young neighbor, Trinity (right), serves as inspiration for wanting to make kids smile. One way to do this, according to Shope, is by coming together as a community to give kids a creative and fun activity to do such as “hunting” stuffed animals and eggs in windows. Courtesy photo

By Jennifer Woods and Martin Graham

Record-Herald Staff Writers