YUSA set to expand with warehouse


WCH location will hire approximately 30 more employees

By Jennifer Woods - jwoods@aimmediamidwest.com



Several robots are in use in the facility that have lessened the physical demands of the job, according to Brice Graham.

Several robots are in use in the facility that have lessened the physical demands of the job, according to Brice Graham.


Jennifer Woods | Record-Herald photo

Behind the YUSA plant and the smoking section for its employees, a new warehouse will be built along with a third retention pond.


Jennifer Woods | Record-Herald photo

An on-site gym is available to employees and their families at a low cost, according to Moe Bagheri.


Jennifer Woods | Record-Herald photo

Inside the YUSA facility are cleared walkways to help with safety. Older equipment currently in the plant will soon be removed to allow for new machinery to be added into the operation and more employees to be hired to operate and maintain those machines.


Jennifer Woods | Record-Herald photo

Pictured at the local YUSA facility are Planning Coordinator Pulati Kadeer, Senior Vice President Moe Bagheri, President Daisuke Yamashita, Vice President over Manufacturing and Equipment Group Brice Graham and Vice President of Administration Paul Grubb.


Jennifer Woods | Record-Herald photo

YUSA Corporation in Washington C.H. is expanding the local facility to include a warehouse which will allow it to hire approximately 30 more employees.

According to senior vice president Moe Bagheri, vice president of administration Paul Grubb and vice president over manufacturing and equipment group Brice Graham, the warehouse will allow them to store more material on-site rather than having to continuously ship it to the facility, will allow them to remove some lesser-used equipment located in the plant and then bring in new equipment.

This equipment assists in the manufacturing of rubber components used in automotives, of which the YUSA Corporation is known for being an industry leader in. Specializations of the local company, located at 151 Jamison Road, include engine mountings, tubes, bushings and hoses.

According to Graham, much thought goes into the manufacturing of individual pieces that many wouldn’t think about — such as building pieces in a certain way so that if a vehicle was to crash, the parts holding the engine would break so that the engine goes downward instead of inward on the driver and passengers.

Although it is unknown yet how much the new employees will be paid, Graham explained it would be competitive to the current market.

Along with the warehouse will be the creation of a third retention pond. These ponds help with run-off, spill-protection and will attract geese, which Bagheri laughed about as he explained there are always several geese in their front pond.

The project is just getting started and is hoped to be completed in August, although the progress is dependent on weather.

In a recent Fayette County Commissioners’ meeting and in a Union Township Board of Trustees special meeting, it was decided to approve a 60 percent tax abatement for YUSA to span 10 years in light of the expansion project.

Currently, YUSA officials explained that the biggest challenge they face is retaining staff even though they provide a cafeteria with food, an on-site gym for employees and their families, on-site free clinic for employees and their families, as well as keeping the facility clean and air conditioned so it doesn’t get too hot.

Although the greatest challenge for them right now is retaining newer employees, there are also employees that have been with the company for a long time who have moved their way up in the company.

Bagheri has been with the company since it first began locally in June of 1987. He explained that he was the second person initially hired. Graham has been with the company since 1989.

The facility also provides YUSA uniforms and safety equipment, along with keeping up on OSHA testing and requirements, according to Grubb. Although the smell in the facility can become strong due to working with rubber, there are air vents and filters utilized.

Graham explained that in the past the company had a reputation for working employees too hard and too much, but have since increased the amount of technology and robots they use in the plant. By adding in these robots, they have managed to lessen physical labor especially in relation to lifting.

“Safety is priority one,” explained Grubb.

The expansion is occurring after Daisuke Yamashita visited the local facility and decided the facility was ready for it.

According to Bagheri, Grubb and Graham, Yamashita is the grandson of Masaru Yamashita, the gentleman that first created YUSA.

Yamashita has traveled the world, according to Grubb, and spends time at various YUSA locations. Currently, he is in his first year as president at the Fayette County location but spent 10 months at YUSA in 2011-2012.

”The expansion adds to the vision my grandfather had for the community. He broke ground here 32 years ago and now I get to honor his legacy by building this warehouse,” said Yamashita.

Those interested in applying to the facility can do so through Indeed.com or stop by the security office to pick up an application. Although Graham suggested prior manufacturing experience would be beneficial, they do have an on-site training center and help provide education assistance for those wishing to pursue a degree in higher education.

They hire both full- and part-time positions. One aspect Graham explained is unique about the part-time positions is that the shifts are a fixed schedule and don’t fluctuate—that way people can depend on a fixed schedule to take care of their children, attend school, etc.

Reach Jennifer Woods at 740-313-0355 or on Twitter @JennMWoods.

Several robots are in use in the facility that have lessened the physical demands of the job, according to Brice Graham.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2020/02/web1_machine.jpgSeveral robots are in use in the facility that have lessened the physical demands of the job, according to Brice Graham. Jennifer Woods | Record-Herald photo

Behind the YUSA plant and the smoking section for its employees, a new warehouse will be built along with a third retention pond.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2020/02/web1_outside.jpgBehind the YUSA plant and the smoking section for its employees, a new warehouse will be built along with a third retention pond. Jennifer Woods | Record-Herald photo

An on-site gym is available to employees and their families at a low cost, according to Moe Bagheri.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2020/02/web1_moe.jpgAn on-site gym is available to employees and their families at a low cost, according to Moe Bagheri. Jennifer Woods | Record-Herald photo

Inside the YUSA facility are cleared walkways to help with safety. Older equipment currently in the plant will soon be removed to allow for new machinery to be added into the operation and more employees to be hired to operate and maintain those machines.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2020/02/web1_long-shot.jpgInside the YUSA facility are cleared walkways to help with safety. Older equipment currently in the plant will soon be removed to allow for new machinery to be added into the operation and more employees to be hired to operate and maintain those machines. Jennifer Woods | Record-Herald photo

Pictured at the local YUSA facility are Planning Coordinator Pulati Kadeer, Senior Vice President Moe Bagheri, President Daisuke Yamashita, Vice President over Manufacturing and Equipment Group Brice Graham and Vice President of Administration Paul Grubb.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2020/02/web1_staff.jpgPictured at the local YUSA facility are Planning Coordinator Pulati Kadeer, Senior Vice President Moe Bagheri, President Daisuke Yamashita, Vice President over Manufacturing and Equipment Group Brice Graham and Vice President of Administration Paul Grubb. Jennifer Woods | Record-Herald photo
WCH location will hire approximately 30 more employees

By Jennifer Woods

jwoods@aimmediamidwest.com