FRHS strives to keep animals healthy


By Jennifer Woods - jwoods@aimmediamidwest.com



Adoption coordinator Bobbi Honicker assisted in installing the PetAirapy systems in the Fayette Regional Humane Society facility in an effort to keep the environment cleaner for animals and pets.

Adoption coordinator Bobbi Honicker assisted in installing the PetAirapy systems in the Fayette Regional Humane Society facility in an effort to keep the environment cleaner for animals and pets.


Courtesy photos

The Fayette Regional Humane Society recently began selling reusable bags to help raise funds for their organization and simultaneously promote less waste in the community.


Courtesy photos

Dr. Lee Schrader, Fayette Regional Humane Society volunteer executive director, and veterinary technician Danyel Bageant assisted during the recent care program, looking over animals who came for a health check.


Courtesy photos

The Fayette Regional Humane Society (FRHS) recently installed a new air system to help its animals, held a care program and began selling reusable shopping bags featuring its logo.

The air system is called “PetAirapy.” According to the PetAirapy site, the units recently installed in the FRHS facility use Ultraviolet germicidal irradiation to help promote strong, healthy living environments.

Brad Adams, chief humane agent for FRHS, said that the units were installed in every room of the animal care and adoption center.

“The new ultraviolet air filtration system is a big step forward in controlling airborne disease transmission,” explained Lee Schrader, FRHS volunteer executive director. “Cats especially are very susceptible to upper respiratory infections when in shelters, and this system is giving us another way to fight these infections.”

According to the PetAirapy website, www.petairapy.com, EPA-approved independent laboratory testing has shown that the PetAirapy system eliminates over 99.9 percent of illness-causing viruses and bacteria at the source.

The units are mobile. Adams explained this mobility will allow the organization to take them to the new FRHS facility once it has been built. The new facility has no definite timeline yet as funds to build it are still being collected and raised in the $1.5 million “Building Hope” campaign.

As previously reported, the new, 7,000 square-foot facility is planned to be located off State Route 41, northwest of Washington C.H. beside the water tower on three acres of land which the city leased to the organization for 99 years. The facility would allow for several more services and space for current services to be provided.

Aside from installing a new air system, the organization recently held “The Care Program,” which has the purpose of assisting low-income individuals with obtaining basic healthcare for their pets. The program recently allowed Village Apartment residents, who previously made an appointment, to bring their “furry companions” to the facility for a health check.

Most apartment complexes, including those on an income-based or rent-controlled system, require residents to keep their pets current on vaccinations, according to Adams. The residents who brought in their “beloved companions” received those required vaccinations along with an examination and monthly topical flea preventive.

“If people are interested in The Care Program, they can call us for an appointment,” explained Schrader. “Veterinary care is available most of the days we are open. We also do special events occasionally in specific areas.”

To help raise funding for those various programs, along with helping to reduce waste in the community, the organization recently began selling reusable bags that contain its logo along with the words, “Helping our animals and our planet.”

The cost is $5 per bag and can be purchased at the FRHS facility, 153 S. Main St. in Washington C.H., during open hours. Open hours are 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Thursday and on Saturdays. Cash, check and cards are accepted.

To learn more or to ask questions about the various programs, please call FRHS at 740-335-8126, visit the FRHS website at fayetteregionalhumane.org, visit the FRHS Facebook page at www.facebook.com/fayettehumaneohio/ or visit the facility in-person.

Reach Jennifer Woods at 740-313-0355 or on Twitter @JennMWoods.

Adoption coordinator Bobbi Honicker assisted in installing the PetAirapy systems in the Fayette Regional Humane Society facility in an effort to keep the environment cleaner for animals and pets.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2020/02/web1_HSAirSystem.jpgAdoption coordinator Bobbi Honicker assisted in installing the PetAirapy systems in the Fayette Regional Humane Society facility in an effort to keep the environment cleaner for animals and pets. Courtesy photos

The Fayette Regional Humane Society recently began selling reusable bags to help raise funds for their organization and simultaneously promote less waste in the community.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2020/02/web1_hsBag.jpgThe Fayette Regional Humane Society recently began selling reusable bags to help raise funds for their organization and simultaneously promote less waste in the community. Courtesy photos

Dr. Lee Schrader, Fayette Regional Humane Society volunteer executive director, and veterinary technician Danyel Bageant assisted during the recent care program, looking over animals who came for a health check.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2020/02/web1_HSVillageLSCDr.jpgDr. Lee Schrader, Fayette Regional Humane Society volunteer executive director, and veterinary technician Danyel Bageant assisted during the recent care program, looking over animals who came for a health check. Courtesy photos

By Jennifer Woods

jwoods@aimmediamidwest.com