Walkers against animal cruelty raise $11,000


By Jennifer Woods - jwoods@aimmediamidwest.com



Prior to the start of the Walk Against Cruelty, Chief Humane Agent Brad Adams (M) gave a speech to the participants. The two dogs standing beside Cindy Zindorf (L) are Hank and Schatzi. Adams and Humane Agent Nick Marando (R) led the walk alongside Hank, Schatzi, Galaxy (not pictured) and Hershey (not pictured).

Prior to the start of the Walk Against Cruelty, Chief Humane Agent Brad Adams (M) gave a speech to the participants. The two dogs standing beside Cindy Zindorf (L) are Hank and Schatzi. Adams and Humane Agent Nick Marando (R) led the walk alongside Hank, Schatzi, Galaxy (not pictured) and Hershey (not pictured).


Courtesy photo

The recent “Walk Against Animal Cruelty,” hosted by the Fayette County Regional Humane Society, occurred this past Saturday—attracting over 170 people and raising approximately $11,000, according to chief humane agent Brad Adams.

This was the seventh year a walk has been hosted by the Humane Society. Adams explained that 165 people registered prior to the walk and approximately 10 more signed up the day of the walk. Last year there were 120 people who registered, so “there were significantly more walkers this year.”

The walk, as explained by Adams, is a fundraising event that raises awareness of animal cruelty.

The walkers weren’t limited to humans as many four-legged furry friends joined in the fun. Four of the dogs that were present had been in previous abuse cases.

Although the humane agents have always led the walk in previous years, this year those four dogs led the walk alongside the humane agents.

“They’re no longer underweight, they’re no longer being abused or neglected. They are now in very loving families,” Adams said. “It was a chance for attendees to see what we can do with funds given to the humane society.”

One of the dogs was “Hershey”—a 9-year-old Pit Bull/Lab mix that has an ongoing case. Although the case is ongoing, Hershey has been adopted by a new family. As previously reported, the Humane Society got involved in the case in July where Hershey had been found underweight, with significant skin loss, with sores, with flaky skin, with hookworms and with an infestation of fleas.

Another dog, “Hank,” came to the Humane Society’s attention after they received a complaint of Hank allegedly being beaten with a stick. The owner willingly handed Hank over to the Humane Society. Hank has been with his new family for approximately two weeks.

“Galaxy” was one of the four dogs and was initially found “emaciated to the point she was in a skeleton state.” According to Adams, Galaxy has been with her new family for approximately eight months.

“She seemed to be so happy at the walk and very engaging,” said Adams. “She looked like she’s very well loved, which is our mission.”

The fourth dog was “Schatzi.” Schatzi is a female boxer who came in very underweight with a severe case of mange and internal parasites. She was adopted by one of the Humane Society’s staff members last year.

Several activities were provided for the various dogs and their families. Activities included raffles and contests. Some of the contests were “best dressed,” “best trick,” “smallest dog” and “largest dog.”

Red Collar, a local company that makes dog food, provided both free collars for the dogs as well as kiddie pools. The pools were meant to be filled with water to assist in keeping pets hydrated.

According to Adams, while dogs did drink the water, there were a few who climbed right on in to cool off.

Several sponsors and other organizations took part. One of the businesses involved was Kona Ice, which provided flavored shaved ice to people and “pup cups” to the pups.

The Sabina Police Department joined in the activity to give canine demonstrations.

The walk itself was approximately one-mile in length and followed the trails of Washington Park and Eyman Park, which are located off Eyman Park Drive in Washington Court House.

“I thank all the people and their pets who participated in this year’s walk,” said Adams. “It helps raise funds to support our humane law enforcement services, such as equipment we need for animal rescues and investigations into cases involving animal cruelty.”

Adams sees the event as a way to bring together pet lovers in the community so they, and the dogs, can socialize with each other. It also allows a valuable opportunity to educate the community on various aspects while raising funds to continue providing services.

Prior to his interview with the Record-Herald, Adams had been writing thank you letters to all those who registered as he believed “it’s important” to thank everyone for their time and assistance.

“We will continue doing it as long as there is interest in this community to join together and walk against animal cruelty,” he said.

Reach Jennifer Woods at 740-313-0355.

Prior to the start of the Walk Against Cruelty, Chief Humane Agent Brad Adams (M) gave a speech to the participants. The two dogs standing beside Cindy Zindorf (L) are Hank and Schatzi. Adams and Humane Agent Nick Marando (R) led the walk alongside Hank, Schatzi, Galaxy (not pictured) and Hershey (not pictured).
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2019/09/web1_humane-walk.jpgPrior to the start of the Walk Against Cruelty, Chief Humane Agent Brad Adams (M) gave a speech to the participants. The two dogs standing beside Cindy Zindorf (L) are Hank and Schatzi. Adams and Humane Agent Nick Marando (R) led the walk alongside Hank, Schatzi, Galaxy (not pictured) and Hershey (not pictured). Courtesy photo

By Jennifer Woods

jwoods@aimmediamidwest.com