Clean-up day scheduled for auditorium


Submitted article



Jeanne Rosendahl, a retired teacher who directed many generations of Blue Lions in choir and musicals during her career, took part in the effort to spruce up the auditorium.

Jeanne Rosendahl, a retired teacher who directed many generations of Blue Lions in choir and musicals during her career, took part in the effort to spruce up the auditorium.


The Washington Middle School band director, Ben Streitenberger, who also acts as the assistant director for the Washington High School band, handled the mowing for the day.


The August clean-up day included students, alumni, teachers, retired teachers, administrators, board members, churches and businesses.


Cherry Hill Primary Secretary Tricia Underwood was one of the many volunteers who assisted in August.


The previous clean-up day for the Washington Historical Auditorium was on Aug. 10.


Students moved out of the building and into the newly-built middle school approximately 10 years ago. Due to this move, daily use of the building stopped which provided the opportunity for vandalism as well as lessened the maintenance being completed to the structure.


During the Aug. 10 clean-up day for the Washington Historic auditorium, over 30 community members volunteered to assist with the project.


The Washington Court House City School (WCHCS) District is hosting a community clean-up day for the Washington Historic Auditorium with everyone in the community being invited to assist.

The clean-up day will be this Saturday from 8 a.m. until noon. Volunteers will be meeting at the auditorium on Temple Street.

“Washington Court House City Schools moved out of the old middle school over 10 years ago,” explained WCHCS Superintendent Tom Bailey, who is in his third year with the district. “Since then, it has become the target of vandalism and suffered greatly from the lack of everyday maintenance in its increasing age.”

The 80-year-old building is still used for academic and arts events, but has not held everyday activities since 2009 as a large potion of the building was later turned into apartments for senior citizens.

Over the past year, a committee of staff and community members have been meeting and working on a plan to increase the use of the facility, as well as bring the historic building back to its former glory without using additional funds.

“The district will continue to support the auditorium with normal wear and tear, just like we do for our educational spaces, the football stadium, track, soccer stadium, tennis courts, baseball and softball complex,” explained Bailey. ”However, the district is not in a position to renovate the auditorium without the help of private individuals, corporations, fundraisers, grants and hard work.”

In efforts to find alternate funding opportunities, the auditorium committee has applied for grants and is planning fundraising opportunities. They have engaged the city, county commissioners and state politicians to build an awareness of the potential the historic auditorium has to offer to the community.

WCHCS hosted the first clean-up day on Aug. 10. Over 30 community members pitched in to help.

That group included students, alumni, teachers, retired teachers, administrators, board members, churches and businesses who volunteered their Saturday morning to give the building a back-to-school spruce up.

“A lot of progress was made in bringing this beautiful building back to life,” said Bailey, “but there’s still plenty of work to be done. We need lots of hands of all ages to help us, so dress comfortable and come ready to get dirty for a great cause.”

Even if volunteers are unable to stay the entire time, they are welcome to help out for any amount of time they can afford to give.

Jeanne Rosendahl, a retired teacher who directed many generations of Blue Lions in choir and musicals during her career, took part in the effort to spruce up the auditorium.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2019/09/web1_rosie.jpgJeanne Rosendahl, a retired teacher who directed many generations of Blue Lions in choir and musicals during her career, took part in the effort to spruce up the auditorium.

The Washington Middle School band director, Ben Streitenberger, who also acts as the assistant director for the Washington High School band, handled the mowing for the day.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2019/09/web1_Stritenberger.jpgThe Washington Middle School band director, Ben Streitenberger, who also acts as the assistant director for the Washington High School band, handled the mowing for the day.

The August clean-up day included students, alumni, teachers, retired teachers, administrators, board members, churches and businesses.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2019/09/web1_thumbnail_IMG_20190810_100522.jpgThe August clean-up day included students, alumni, teachers, retired teachers, administrators, board members, churches and businesses.

Cherry Hill Primary Secretary Tricia Underwood was one of the many volunteers who assisted in August.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2019/09/web1_thumbnail_IMG_20190810_095410_1.jpgCherry Hill Primary Secretary Tricia Underwood was one of the many volunteers who assisted in August.

The previous clean-up day for the Washington Historical Auditorium was on Aug. 10.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2019/09/web1_thumbnail_IMG_20190810_101348.jpgThe previous clean-up day for the Washington Historical Auditorium was on Aug. 10.

Students moved out of the building and into the newly-built middle school approximately 10 years ago. Due to this move, daily use of the building stopped which provided the opportunity for vandalism as well as lessened the maintenance being completed to the structure.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2019/09/web1_thumbnail_IMG_20190810_101426.jpgStudents moved out of the building and into the newly-built middle school approximately 10 years ago. Due to this move, daily use of the building stopped which provided the opportunity for vandalism as well as lessened the maintenance being completed to the structure.

During the Aug. 10 clean-up day for the Washington Historic auditorium, over 30 community members volunteered to assist with the project.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2019/09/web1_thumbnail_IMG_20190810_095025.jpgDuring the Aug. 10 clean-up day for the Washington Historic auditorium, over 30 community members volunteered to assist with the project.

Submitted article