FRHS helps Pike County with removal of dogs


Submitted by FRHS



Brad Adams, humane agent for Fayette County Regional Humane Society, taking part in the joint rescue effort in Pike County after the owner’s death left behind numerous dogs—approximately 52 dogs were removed by the FRHS, RCHS, Pike County Sheriff’s Office and the Pike County Dog Warden.

Brad Adams, humane agent for Fayette County Regional Humane Society, taking part in the joint rescue effort in Pike County after the owner’s death left behind numerous dogs—approximately 52 dogs were removed by the FRHS, RCHS, Pike County Sheriff’s Office and the Pike County Dog Warden.


Courtesy Photo

Pictured is one of the approximate 52 dogs rescued during the joint rescue effort in Pike County by FRHS, RCHS, Pike County Sheriff’s Office and the Pike County Dog Warden. The breeds were Shih Tzu and Shih Tzu mixes.


Courtesy Photo

PIKE COUNTY — After Fayette Regional Humane Society (FRHS) received a call for help from Pike County Sheriff’s Office Chief Deputy Bentley Monday afternoon, FRHS humane agents and administrative staff from the Ross County Humane Society (RCHS) traveled to a residence in southwest Pike County.

According to FRHS, Bentley contacted chief humane agent Brad Adams, stating that his deputies arrived to a residence with a deceased person with approximately 65 to 70 dogs inside.

Bentley told Adams that they’ve never had a situation like that and didn’t have the resources to remove that many dogs.

“I explained to chief deputy Bentley that we were unable to house a large number of dogs—however, I did offer manpower between myself and humane agent Nick Marando, as well as both vans for the transport of dogs,” said Adams. “We also offered to take as many dogs that we could into our downtown facility and would reach out to other humane societies in the area to assist.”

Adams contacted RCHS Executive Director Jenn Thomas and asked if they would join the rescue operation. Without pause, Thomas and her staff loaded cages in their van and followed FRHS agents to the Pike County location.

Nearly 30 dogs and puppies were transported back to the FRHS and RCHS for housing, care and treatment—13 went to FRHS and 15 to RCHS. The remainder of the dogs were placed at the Pike County Dog Shelter and with nearby residents who were willing to help.

The breeds were Shih Tzu and Shih Tzu mixes.

According to FRHS, some of the dogs were so matted, that when bathed and groomed, sores were found from the matted hair pulling on their skin. Some of the dogs had hair loss, and flea infestation was present.

RCHS discovered missing eyes from dogs that they took.

“While we were transporting the dogs back to our downtown animal care and adoption center, staff were preparing for the dogs and puppies arrival by setting up their kennels with food, water, bedding and toys,” said Adams.

“All of dogs were very friendly. A couple of them are still scared—but they still wag their tails when staff socializes with them.”

Veterinary technician Danyel Bageant and adoption coordinator Bobbi Honicker told Catherine Yeoman, owner of The Good Dog Groomery, about the situation. Yeoman offered a complete grooming to the dogs as a contribution to the rescue.

“It was a great team effort between all who were involved in yesterday’s rescue,” said Marando.

Approximately 52 dogs were removed by the FRHS, RCHS, Pike County Sheriff’s Office and the Pike County Dog Warden.

FRHS said that this was a sad situation all around—for the family and friends who lost a loved one and for the dogs and puppies in the situation.

FRHS is thankful for the RCHS joint rescue effort and all of the animal care staff who helped with the care of the dogs and puppies.

FRHS said that rescues like this that are unexpected can be costly with providing the animals needed healthcare, vaccines, deworming, blood testing, flea treatments and the spaying or neutering to prepare them for adoption.

Donations would help with the dogs taken into the FRHS care and with future rescues. If anyone would like to make a contribution to help prepare the dogs and puppies for their new homes, please click on “Donate Now” at www.fayettehumanesociety.org or by mailing it to 153 S. Main St., Suite 3. Washington C.H., OH 43160

The Fayette Regional Humane Society is a non-profit (501(c)(3), volunteer organization. They receive less than 2 percent of their support from governmental organizations and therefore must rely on donations, grants and fundraising to carry out their mission.

The Humane Society is the only organization in Fayette County able to respond to calls about abused, neglected and injured domestic animals, 24 hours per day, seven days per week. To learn more about the Fayette Regional Humane Society, please visit their website at www.fayettehumanesociety.com

Brad Adams, humane agent for Fayette County Regional Humane Society, taking part in the joint rescue effort in Pike County after the owner’s death left behind numerous dogs—approximately 52 dogs were removed by the FRHS, RCHS, Pike County Sheriff’s Office and the Pike County Dog Warden.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2019/06/web1_adams.jpgBrad Adams, humane agent for Fayette County Regional Humane Society, taking part in the joint rescue effort in Pike County after the owner’s death left behind numerous dogs—approximately 52 dogs were removed by the FRHS, RCHS, Pike County Sheriff’s Office and the Pike County Dog Warden. Courtesy Photo

Pictured is one of the approximate 52 dogs rescued during the joint rescue effort in Pike County by FRHS, RCHS, Pike County Sheriff’s Office and the Pike County Dog Warden. The breeds were Shih Tzu and Shih Tzu mixes.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2019/06/web1_pup.jpgPictured is one of the approximate 52 dogs rescued during the joint rescue effort in Pike County by FRHS, RCHS, Pike County Sheriff’s Office and the Pike County Dog Warden. The breeds were Shih Tzu and Shih Tzu mixes. Courtesy Photo

Submitted by FRHS