Locals celebrating St. Patrick’s Day


By Jennifer Woods - jwoods@aimmediamidwest.com



Jeffersonville Branch Carnegie Library celebrated by making Saint Patrick day inspired bracelets. Pictured are Wendy, Gabriella, Jessica,Cali, Kenley, William and Kyler.

Jeffersonville Branch Carnegie Library celebrated by making Saint Patrick day inspired bracelets. Pictured are Wendy, Gabriella, Jessica,Cali, Kenley, William and Kyler.


Courtesy photos

Saint Patrick’s Day festivities at Washington Court House branch Carnegie Library. Pictured are Channing, Avery and Colin.


Courtesy photos

Saint Patrick’s Day is a time to celebrate Irish culture on March 17. Initially, the day was in remembrance of Saint Patrick, a patron saint of Ireland, as his day of death was believed to be March 17. The year is not known for sure, but there are those who believe it was year 461.

Saint Patrick’s Day is celebrated in many ways around the world. Many in Fayette County celebrate the Irish festivity in different ways — from wearing green, to having parties, to even hosting a fundraiser.

Local bars are having parties on Saturday, March 16. Carnegie Public Library had early celebrations in both the Washington Court House and Jeffersonville locations.

The American Legion Post 25 is hosting a Saint Patrick’s breakfast buffet on Sunday, March 17. The proceeds will benefit the Buckeye Girls State. It costs $7 and runs from 9 a.m. to noon.

St. Patrick’s real name is believed to have been Maewyn Succat. His exact place and year of birth is unknown. Although several sources do agree that he was born in Roman Britain and his father was a Roman-British army officer and a deacon.

At age 16, St. Patrick was taken prisoner among numerous others and was placed into slavery. He was made a slave in Ireland where he had to work as a herdsman for sheep.

Years of enslavement brought a love for God into his heart and showed him how small he was in relation to the world around him. Patrick reasoned that the kidnappings and enslavement were punishments for lack of faith.

After approximately six years of enslavement, he was able to join a ship and escape to his family. Patrick became more involved in the church. He studied under many figures.

Although it was several years after he’d escaped, Patrick did return to Ireland to be a missionary.

He faced many conflicts and times of imprisonment but is often credited for bringing Christianity to Ireland. He wasn’t the only one to do so, but he left behind many monasteries, churches and schools.

Symbols of St. Patrick’s day includes the shamrock, the color green, the Celtic cross, leprechauns and pots of gold. People will often eat Irish dishes. It’s believed St. Patrick used the shamrock as a metaphor for the Holy Trinity: the idea that God is one entity comprised of the father, the son and the holy spirit.

“Saint Patrick’s Confessio” can be searched online for writings credited to the saint. There is also a translated ebook available for purchase called “The Confession of Saint Patrick,” which is labeled as an autobiography.

Reach Jennifer Woods at 740-313-0355 or on Twitter @kenanipel.

Jeffersonville Branch Carnegie Library celebrated by making Saint Patrick day inspired bracelets. Pictured are Wendy, Gabriella, Jessica,Cali, Kenley, William and Kyler.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2019/03/web1_jeff-st-pat.jpgJeffersonville Branch Carnegie Library celebrated by making Saint Patrick day inspired bracelets. Pictured are Wendy, Gabriella, Jessica,Cali, Kenley, William and Kyler. Courtesy photos

Saint Patrick’s Day festivities at Washington Court House branch Carnegie Library. Pictured are Channing, Avery and Colin.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2019/03/web1_wch.jpgSaint Patrick’s Day festivities at Washington Court House branch Carnegie Library. Pictured are Channing, Avery and Colin. Courtesy photos

By Jennifer Woods

jwoods@aimmediamidwest.com