Altrusa focuses on literacy


On Saturday, Altrusa International of Washington C.H., Inc., commemorated “Make A Difference Day,” established in 1992 as a day encouraging volunteers to give back to their communities and now the nation’s largest community-service endeavor. The local project, organized by Altrusan Debra Corbell-Grover, was the club’s fourth-annual “Young Authors’ Workshop” at Carnegie Library. First to deliver his created book to the binder (Altrusan/Children’s Department Director Anne Quinn) was Mason Yahn (6), standing beside Quinn. Also pictured behind him are his Uncle Justin, sister Addison and mom Mandy Knisley.

On Saturday, Altrusa International of Washington C.H., Inc., commemorated “Make A Difference Day,” established in 1992 as a day encouraging volunteers to give back to their communities and now the nation’s largest community-service endeavor. The local project, organized by Altrusan Debra Corbell-Grover, was the club’s fourth-annual “Young Authors’ Workshop” at Carnegie Library. First to deliver his created book to the binder (Altrusan/Children’s Department Director Anne Quinn) was Mason Yahn (6), standing beside Quinn. Also pictured behind him are his Uncle Justin, sister Addison and mom Mandy Knisley.


Literacy is a major focus of Altrusa International, so not only did the local schoolchildren attending Altrusa’s “Young Authors’ Workshop” on Saturday write and/or illustrate their own books, but they also were invited to take home a gift book from a table filled with colorful Scholastic books. Proudly showing off the books they had chosen are two six-year-old cousins: (from left) Palmer Mitchell and Breslyn Lyons.


Nearly three dozen people spread between the library’s meeting room, a nearby cozy corner and the main Children’s Department room on Saturday, all contentedly either creating homemade books or else advising the youngsters in their care at this “Make A Difference Day” event. Not surprisingly, both current and retired teachers from both of Fayette County’s public school systems— and even Principal Maggie Lyons of Cherry Hill Primary—were among the parents and grandparents encouraging the hands-on literacy project. (Washington C.H. City Schools Superintendent Tom Bailey had brought his three children last year.) Shown are Altrusan Alice Craig, retired from teaching German at Washington High School, and Rosemary Howell, an intervention specialist at Washington Middle School. The latter’s 7-year-old granddaughter, Nevaeh Reed, helps hold the Altrusa sign that shows the organization’s focus: “Leading to a Better Community.”


On Saturday, Altrusa International of Washington C.H., Inc., commemorated “Make A Difference Day,” established in 1992 as a day encouraging volunteers to give back to their communities and now the nation’s largest community-service endeavor. The local project, organized by Altrusan Debra Corbell-Grover, was the club’s fourth-annual “Young Authors’ Workshop” at Carnegie Library. First to deliver his created book to the binder (Altrusan/Children’s Department Director Anne Quinn) was Mason Yahn (6), standing beside Quinn. Also pictured behind him are his Uncle Justin, sister Addison and mom Mandy Knisley.

Literacy is a major focus of Altrusa International, so not only did the local schoolchildren attending Altrusa’s “Young Authors’ Workshop” on Saturday write and/or illustrate their own books, but they also were invited to take home a gift book from a table filled with colorful Scholastic books. Proudly showing off the books they had chosen are two six-year-old cousins: (from left) Palmer Mitchell and Breslyn Lyons.

Nearly three dozen people spread between the library’s meeting room, a nearby cozy corner and the main Children’s Department room on Saturday, all contentedly either creating homemade books or else advising the youngsters in their care at this “Make A Difference Day” event. Not surprisingly, both current and retired teachers from both of Fayette County’s public school systems— and even Principal Maggie Lyons of Cherry Hill Primary—were among the parents and grandparents encouraging the hands-on literacy project. (Washington C.H. City Schools Superintendent Tom Bailey had brought his three children last year.) Shown are Altrusan Alice Craig, retired from teaching German at Washington High School, and Rosemary Howell, an intervention specialist at Washington Middle School. The latter’s 7-year-old granddaughter, Nevaeh Reed, helps hold the Altrusa sign that shows the organization’s focus: “Leading to a Better Community.”

On Saturday, Altrusa International of Washington C.H., Inc., commemorated “Make A Difference Day,” established in 1992 as a day encouraging volunteers to give back to their communities and now the nation’s largest community-service endeavor. The local project, organized by Altrusan Debra Corbell-Grover, was the club’s fourth-annual “Young Authors’ Workshop” at Carnegie Library. First to deliver his created book to the binder (Altrusan/Children’s Department Director Anne Quinn) was Mason Yahn (6), standing beside Quinn. Also pictured behind him are his Uncle Justin, sister Addison and mom Mandy Knisley.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2018/11/web1_20181103_092340.jpgOn Saturday, Altrusa International of Washington C.H., Inc., commemorated “Make A Difference Day,” established in 1992 as a day encouraging volunteers to give back to their communities and now the nation’s largest community-service endeavor. The local project, organized by Altrusan Debra Corbell-Grover, was the club’s fourth-annual “Young Authors’ Workshop” at Carnegie Library. First to deliver his created book to the binder (Altrusan/Children’s Department Director Anne Quinn) was Mason Yahn (6), standing beside Quinn. Also pictured behind him are his Uncle Justin, sister Addison and mom Mandy Knisley.

Literacy is a major focus of Altrusa International, so not only did the local schoolchildren attending Altrusa’s “Young Authors’ Workshop” on Saturday write and/or illustrate their own books, but they also were invited to take home a gift book from a table filled with colorful Scholastic books. Proudly showing off the books they had chosen are two six-year-old cousins: (from left) Palmer Mitchell and Breslyn Lyons.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2018/11/web1_20181103_093011.jpgLiteracy is a major focus of Altrusa International, so not only did the local schoolchildren attending Altrusa’s “Young Authors’ Workshop” on Saturday write and/or illustrate their own books, but they also were invited to take home a gift book from a table filled with colorful Scholastic books. Proudly showing off the books they had chosen are two six-year-old cousins: (from left) Palmer Mitchell and Breslyn Lyons.

Nearly three dozen people spread between the library’s meeting room, a nearby cozy corner and the main Children’s Department room on Saturday, all contentedly either creating homemade books or else advising the youngsters in their care at this “Make A Difference Day” event. Not surprisingly, both current and retired teachers from both of Fayette County’s public school systems— and even Principal Maggie Lyons of Cherry Hill Primary—were among the parents and grandparents encouraging the hands-on literacy project. (Washington C.H. City Schools Superintendent Tom Bailey had brought his three children last year.) Shown are Altrusan Alice Craig, retired from teaching German at Washington High School, and Rosemary Howell, an intervention specialist at Washington Middle School. The latter’s 7-year-old granddaughter, Nevaeh Reed, helps hold the Altrusa sign that shows the organization’s focus: “Leading to a Better Community.”
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2018/11/web1_20181103_101056.jpgNearly three dozen people spread between the library’s meeting room, a nearby cozy corner and the main Children’s Department room on Saturday, all contentedly either creating homemade books or else advising the youngsters in their care at this “Make A Difference Day” event. Not surprisingly, both current and retired teachers from both of Fayette County’s public school systems— and even Principal Maggie Lyons of Cherry Hill Primary—were among the parents and grandparents encouraging the hands-on literacy project. (Washington C.H. City Schools Superintendent Tom Bailey had brought his three children last year.) Shown are Altrusan Alice Craig, retired from teaching German at Washington High School, and Rosemary Howell, an intervention specialist at Washington Middle School. The latter’s 7-year-old granddaughter, Nevaeh Reed, helps hold the Altrusa sign that shows the organization’s focus: “Leading to a Better Community.”