Dylan Page earns Eagle Scout designation


By Bev Mullen - For the Record-Herald



Scout Master and Fayette County Museum Trustee Glenn Rankin, Eagle Scout Dylan Page and Museum Trustee Don Moore.

Scout Master and Fayette County Museum Trustee Glenn Rankin, Eagle Scout Dylan Page and Museum Trustee Don Moore.


Dylan Page’s father and mother, David and Dawn Page, participated in the Eagle Scout pinning ceremony.


We celebrate 50th birthdays. We celebrate 50th anniversaries. We celebrate 50 years in business. There are other 50s milestones to be celebrated, like for instance celebrating the 50th Fayette County Boy Scout to have earned the designation of Eagle Scout.

Recently, an Eagle Scout Court of Honor was held for Dylan Page, a 2018 Miami Trace High School graduate, by his Troop 112 under the direction of scoutmaster John Pickelheimer. Eagle Scout is the highest rank a scout may attain.

There are rigorous requirements that must be achieved before a scout can be awarded this honor. Potential Eagle Scouts must have earned at least 21 merit badges and need to have completed a community service project.

Dylan’s project was to make the brick walkway at the entrance of the Fayette County Museum safer for visitors. The bricks were uneven, making the walk to the front door potentially dangerous to visitors. After many hours of digging up the original bricks and re-laying them in a pleasing , historic pattern, the museum now has a safe and beautiful new entrance. The trustees of the museum expressed great pleasure with the completed project.

Dylan started his path to Eagle Scout by joining the scouts as a Bobcat in 2008. Dylan advanced through nine different levels, acquiring not only these honors but additional honors, such as Order of the Arrow (Ordeal and Brotherhood), National Youth and Leadership Training and Scouting’s World Conservation Award, as well as the coveted Eagle Psalms: Bronze, Gold and Silver.

The pinning ceremony included Dylan’s mother and father, Dawn and David Page, recognizing their help and guidance through the years. Gary Scherer, state representative of the Ohio 92nd District and also an Eagle Scout, spoke highly of the scouting program, and particularly spoke of the caliber of young men like Dylan who earn the honor of Eagle Scout and go into the space program, politics or become head of their own companies.

At the close of the court, the family hosted a reception for those attending. In the near future there will be a permanent marker at the front steps of the museum commemorating Dylan’s achievement.

There are many famous men down through history who have achieved this honor: Astronaut Neil Armstrong, James Baker (press secretary to President Ronald Reagan), and film director Steven Spielberg to name just three. Since 1912, more than two million Boy Scouts have earned the Eagle Scout rank.

In the words of the Eagle Scout Promise: “Eagle Scouts do their best each day to make their training an example, their rank and their influence count strongly for better Scouting and for better citizenship in their troop, in their community and in their contacts with other people.” To this creed, they pledge their sacred honor.

Scout Master and Fayette County Museum Trustee Glenn Rankin, Eagle Scout Dylan Page and Museum Trustee Don Moore.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2018/05/web1_5C051E9B-CB5C-4BC8-B3D2-8621FF3F7434.jpegScout Master and Fayette County Museum Trustee Glenn Rankin, Eagle Scout Dylan Page and Museum Trustee Don Moore.

Dylan Page’s father and mother, David and Dawn Page, participated in the Eagle Scout pinning ceremony.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2018/05/web1_8D33F68E-A649-4863-B541-B06A5497AB14.jpegDylan Page’s father and mother, David and Dawn Page, participated in the Eagle Scout pinning ceremony.

By Bev Mullen

For the Record-Herald

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