Community wears orange for Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month


‘When push comes to shove, it’s no longer love’

The theme for this year’s dance was “Hands Unite.” During the dance the kids were asked to trace their hand and write “what love is” to them. When the project was complete the banner was given to Molly Gruber to be put on display at The Warehouse Youth Center.

The theme for this year’s dance was “Hands Unite.” During the dance the kids were asked to trace their hand and write “what love is” to them. When the project was complete the banner was given to Molly Gruber to be put on display at The Warehouse Youth Center.


On Friday, Feb. 16, Victim Witness collaborated with The Warehouse Youth Center for the second-annual #LoveIsRespect #Orange4Love Dance. The speaker, Linda Lee, had an interactive discussion with the kids about teen dating violence. The kids learned about healthy and unhealthy relationships, types and signs of abuse, how to help a friend in an abusive relationship, statistics, and resources. At the end of the discussion, she spoke to the kids about her life growing up.


Wear Orange Day, Feb. 13. We wear orange in honor of Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month. Nearly 1.5 million high school students experience physical abuse from a dating partner in the U.S. each year. Two out of three teens in an abusive relationship never tell anyone about the abuse. Four out of five girls who have been physically abused continue to date their abuser. One in three high school relationships involve some sort of physical, emotional, or sexual abuse. #RespectWeek2018 #Orange4Love


The speaker at the #LoveIsRespect #Orange4Love Dance, Linda Lee, had an interactive discussion with the kids about teen dating violence. Lee said the following after the the dance:

“On February 16, 2018, I had the privilege of taking part in the informational segment surrounding Teen Dating Violence Prevention Week. During this segment, held at The Warehouse, I was able to offer small bits of my personal story. This story included me witnessing unhealthy patterns of relationship violence among family members and swearing I would never be ‘one of them.’ However, without any guidelines of what a healthy relationship looked like, I became involved with an abusive man at an early age. During this relationship the unhealthy patterns I had sworn to steer clear of had become my relationship reality. The jealousy, name calling and physical abuse were running rampant in my everyday life. I lost several of my teen years and most of my 20s to these types of behaviors. In the end, I nearly lost my life, as well.

“Following my speech I had the opportunity to partake in a question and answer session with several of the youth. They had legitimate questions that included: Do I have to have sex with my partner? Is name calling ‘really’ abuse? What if he tells me I can’t see my friends? How do you break up with someone? How does someone love me when I don’t know how to love myself? In addition to the questions there were statements that included: She threatens to break my legs if I don’t have sex with her. I will kick him out of my house if he withholds sex. She’s not allowed to talk to her friends if I’m not with her. My life isn’t worth anymore than a bag of skittles. I don’t even know what self worth is.

“These kids were so full of questions and actively listened to each answer provided. It was an honor to take part in this event. I look forward to next year.”

What is dating abuse? Here are 10 signs:

1.) Isolation: a way of keeping a person away from their friends and family.

2.) Jealousy: an abuser’s way of getting mad at the victim for doing something. An example would be talking to someone of the opposite sex.

3.) Possessiveness: Indicates that your partner “owns” you.

4.) Double Standards: When the abuser sets rule for you but does not follow the rules themselves.

5.) Name Calling: a form of verbal abuse, abusive or insulting language towards another person.

6.) Controlling Behavior: having power and control over another person’s life/daily activities.

7.) Threats of Self Harm: When the abuser threatens to harm or kill themselves if their partner threatens to leave the relationship.

8.) Playing Rough: A way of showing intimidation and power while wrestling around.

9.) Non-Consensual Sex: Involves sexual intercourse with a person, however, one person does not give consent (permission) to have sex.

10.) Violence: A way of becoming aggressive toward the victim. Examples would be punching, kicking, biting, or spitting on them. Abusers are more likely to be physically violent to the victim on a part of their body that cannot be seen.

The theme for this year’s dance was “Hands Unite.” During the dance the kids were asked to trace their hand and write “what love is” to them. When the project was complete the banner was given to Molly Gruber to be put on display at The Warehouse Youth Center.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2018/02/web1_OrangeDay8-1.jpgThe theme for this year’s dance was “Hands Unite.” During the dance the kids were asked to trace their hand and write “what love is” to them. When the project was complete the banner was given to Molly Gruber to be put on display at The Warehouse Youth Center.

https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2018/02/web1_OrangeDay7-1.jpg

https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2018/02/web1_OrangeDay6-1.jpg

https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2018/02/web1_OrangeDay5-1.jpg

On Friday, Feb. 16, Victim Witness collaborated with The Warehouse Youth Center for the second-annual #LoveIsRespect #Orange4Love Dance. The speaker, Linda Lee, had an interactive discussion with the kids about teen dating violence. The kids learned about healthy and unhealthy relationships, types and signs of abuse, how to help a friend in an abusive relationship, statistics, and resources. At the end of the discussion, she spoke to the kids about her life growing up.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2018/02/web1_OrangeDay4-1.jpgOn Friday, Feb. 16, Victim Witness collaborated with The Warehouse Youth Center for the second-annual #LoveIsRespect #Orange4Love Dance. The speaker, Linda Lee, had an interactive discussion with the kids about teen dating violence. The kids learned about healthy and unhealthy relationships, types and signs of abuse, how to help a friend in an abusive relationship, statistics, and resources. At the end of the discussion, she spoke to the kids about her life growing up.

https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2018/02/web1_OrangeDay3-1.jpg

https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2018/02/web1_OrangeDay2-1.jpg

Wear Orange Day, Feb. 13. We wear orange in honor of Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month. Nearly 1.5 million high school students experience physical abuse from a dating partner in the U.S. each year. Two out of three teens in an abusive relationship never tell anyone about the abuse. Four out of five girls who have been physically abused continue to date their abuser. One in three high school relationships involve some sort of physical, emotional, or sexual abuse. #RespectWeek2018 #Orange4Love
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2018/02/web1_OrangeDay1-1.jpgWear Orange Day, Feb. 13. We wear orange in honor of Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month. Nearly 1.5 million high school students experience physical abuse from a dating partner in the U.S. each year. Two out of three teens in an abusive relationship never tell anyone about the abuse. Four out of five girls who have been physically abused continue to date their abuser. One in three high school relationships involve some sort of physical, emotional, or sexual abuse. #RespectWeek2018 #Orange4Love
‘When push comes to shove, it’s no longer love’

The speaker at the #LoveIsRespect #Orange4Love Dance, Linda Lee, had an interactive discussion with the kids about teen dating violence. Lee said the following after the the dance:

“On February 16, 2018, I had the privilege of taking part in the informational segment surrounding Teen Dating Violence Prevention Week. During this segment, held at The Warehouse, I was able to offer small bits of my personal story. This story included me witnessing unhealthy patterns of relationship violence among family members and swearing I would never be ‘one of them.’ However, without any guidelines of what a healthy relationship looked like, I became involved with an abusive man at an early age. During this relationship the unhealthy patterns I had sworn to steer clear of had become my relationship reality. The jealousy, name calling and physical abuse were running rampant in my everyday life. I lost several of my teen years and most of my 20s to these types of behaviors. In the end, I nearly lost my life, as well.

“Following my speech I had the opportunity to partake in a question and answer session with several of the youth. They had legitimate questions that included: Do I have to have sex with my partner? Is name calling ‘really’ abuse? What if he tells me I can’t see my friends? How do you break up with someone? How does someone love me when I don’t know how to love myself? In addition to the questions there were statements that included: She threatens to break my legs if I don’t have sex with her. I will kick him out of my house if he withholds sex. She’s not allowed to talk to her friends if I’m not with her. My life isn’t worth anymore than a bag of skittles. I don’t even know what self worth is.

“These kids were so full of questions and actively listened to each answer provided. It was an honor to take part in this event. I look forward to next year.”

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