Fayette Garden Club hosts September meeting


Submitted by Mary Estle



The September meeting of the Fayette Garden Club was held in a country setting surrounded by a variety of trees and plants.

The September meeting of the Fayette Garden Club was held in a country setting surrounded by a variety of trees and plants.


Courtesy photo

The September meeting of the Fayette Garden Cub was held in a country setting, surrounded by a great variety of trees and plants.

It was the first day of fall-like weather which made sitting around a campfire very appropriate.

A very short business meeting was conducted by president Julia Hidy. Pat Parsons was in charge of the afternoon activity, a scavenger hunt.

Teams of three were given a list of 21 trees, flowers and other plants to find. Some items were easy to locate, like an acorn, Queen Anne’s Lace, and a walnut tree leaf. Others on the list were harder to spot — a teasel blossom, an ironweed flower, and a wild ginger leaf.

After the hunt, Parsons shared lesser known information on a couple of the plants listed. In the 1920s, a hybrid tea rose was introduced from overseas. Unfortunately through the years it grew into the multi-flora rose that became very invasive.

Bush honeysuckle is another such bush that is hard to eliminate once it gets established.

Many other interesting facts were given abut the plants commonly found in Fayette County. Parsons ended by sharing the Johnny Appleseed Prayer.

Those enjoying the scavenger hunt, the campfire and of course the s’mores were: Debbie Carr, Jodi Kirkpatrick, Julia Hidy, Mary Estle, Barbara Sams, Linda Warfield, Jean Smith, Pam Rhoades, Jonathon Bowen and Pat Parsons.

The October meeting will be held at Jodi Kirkpatrick’s on Oct. 9. It will be our annual white elephant sale.

The September meeting of the Fayette Garden Club was held in a country setting surrounded by a variety of trees and plants.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2020/09/web1_img107.jpgThe September meeting of the Fayette Garden Club was held in a country setting surrounded by a variety of trees and plants. Courtesy photo

Submitted by Mary Estle