Daisies attend Lebanon Garden Tour


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Pictured (L-R) are garden club members of the Deer Creek Daisies: Emily King, Marty Cook, Connie Lindsey, Shirley Pettit and Judy Gentry. This was at the property of numerous hostas and ferns.

Pictured (L-R) are garden club members of the Deer Creek Daisies: Emily King, Marty Cook, Connie Lindsey, Shirley Pettit and Judy Gentry. This was at the property of numerous hostas and ferns.


Courtesy photo

On Saturday, June 22 the Deer Creek Daisies journeyed to Lebanon for the 29th-annual Lebanon Garden Tour.

According to a brochure handed out during the tour, in 1972 there were four garden clubs of about 120 women who were interested in purchasing the property where the Lebanon Station stands today. It was overrun with weeds, used-cars and a dilapidated freight station.

Penn Station Railroad sold the property to Lebanon Council of Garden Clubs, Inc. The old station was torn down and a replica was built and finished in 1974. Over the years there were various fundraisers that have been held to maintain the building and property.

The goal of the Garden Clubs Council is to beautify and educate the community thus preserving the historic value of the city of Lebanon.

The day of the tour started off early with breakfast at the Breakfast Club Restaurant in the historic downtown area. A meeting was held to discuss some upcoming events that hosts Shirley Pettit and Connie Lindsey.

During conversations the garden club members praised the Fayette County Master Gardeners for their dedication and hard work of beautifying the downtown Washington Courts House area with numerous sponsored pots of flowers. It takes a lot of planning and time to select, plant, water and fertilize each pot.

Becoming a sponsor is simple. Those interested can contact any master gardener such as Don and Sarah Creamer.

During the breakfast meeting Connie talked about designing with hostas. Noted in “Birds and Blooms,” hostas can add color to shade gardens and are low maintenance and give wildlife benefits. They make a nice focal point in any garden. One of the newest hostas is Mama Mia.

The garden tour featured six homes and gardens, most of which were a century old. The first home visited was built in 1840. Their gardens were mostly shade with many sitting areas, a decorated gazebo and a featured umbrella pine tree.

Another home built in 1848 featured a large millstone paved into a back patio that was likely used by the original home owner in the operation of his 1840s dry goods business. Two of the home’s turn-of-century chimney caps have been re-purposed as decorative planters within the gardens.

A home built in 1871 featured a massive amount of hostas and ferns. The pink Eden Rose on the trellis by the front porch is depicted in Rockwood Pottery tiles and pieces.

Another home built in 1840 was once property of 60 acres referred to as “the Orchards.” Today it is one acre of every imaginable plant and flower. A type of Bamboo not native to Ohio (in a controlled growth) acts as a privacy wall enclosing a patio. A focal point of this residence was the bottle brush buckeye.

An 1882 residence featured over 30 trees. According to the Tree Council, you will find the oldest oak on private property and the oldest Mulberry Tree in Lebanon. Numerous hostas and corabells were in their shade garden.

The last stop for the tour was a charming cottage-like home built in 1950. Colorful window boxes filled with summer annuals adorned the home. Wisteria growing over a pergola was featured at the back door. Colorful flower gardens and sitting places were in various locations in the backyard. The picket fence surrounding the property made it complete.

With the beauty of numerous annuals and perennials in each garden, participants noted there seemed to be a variety of hostas featured. With the excessive amount of rainfall this year the hostas seemed to “steal the show.”

Some garden quotes that were made and posted by those who were hosting their beautiful gardens were:

-“Gardening is a matter of your enthusiasm holding up until your back gets use to it.”

-“If you have a garden and a library you have everything you need,” by Cicero

-“Conserve what you have and your garden will last forever.”

-“Our goal for the yard is enjoyment.”

-“Digging in the dirt takes all your cares and worries away.”

All information in this article was submitted by the Deer Creek Daisies.

Pictured (L-R) are garden club members of the Deer Creek Daisies: Emily King, Marty Cook, Connie Lindsey, Shirley Pettit and Judy Gentry. This was at the property of numerous hostas and ferns.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2019/07/web1_daisies-pic.jpegPictured (L-R) are garden club members of the Deer Creek Daisies: Emily King, Marty Cook, Connie Lindsey, Shirley Pettit and Judy Gentry. This was at the property of numerous hostas and ferns. Courtesy photo

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