Public health is where you are


By Leigh Cannon, MPH - FCPH Deputy Health Commissioner



During the first full week of April each year, the American Public Health Association (APHA) brings together communities across the United States to observe National Public Health Week (NPHW) as a time to recognize the contributions of public health and highlight issues that are important to improving our nation’s health. No matter where you are, APHA invites you to join us as we celebrate National Public Health Week!

This year’s theme, Public Health Is Where You Are, celebrates what we know is true: The places where we are, physically, mentally, and societally, affect our health and our lives. As we celebrate the 27th NPHW, April 4-10, we want everyone to know they can make their communities healthier and safer for all. We have probably all learned more about Public Health in the last two years than we ever anticipated, and now that we are back to being able to return to a “normal” way of life we are encouraging everyone — public health professionals, students, elected leaders, and the public — to step in and do what they can to make our world a more equitable, safe, healthy place to live!

This year’s daily themes from APHA include:

MONDAY: RACISM – A PUBLIC HEALTH CRISIS

Racist inequities in health care, income, housing, education have widened during the COVID-19 pandemic, harming health and well-being. We must address the public health crisis of racism and advance racial equity to improve health.

TUESDAY: PUBLIC HEALTH WORKFORCE

ESSENTIAL TO OUR FUTURE The public health workforce is essential to our future. Let’s support these professionals and strengthen the public health authority for better health outcomes in all of our communities, now and in the future. Fayette County Public Health (FCPH) strives to provide public health services to our community. Placing emphasis on health promotion and disease prevention. FCPH will be the central force that brings together all partners for optimal public health services.

WEDNESDAY: COMMUNITY – COLLABORATION AND RESILIENCE

We must work together to improve housing, education, food, transportation, and the environment to support equity, resilience and the health of our communities and the people who live, work, play and learn in Fayette County.

THURSDAY: WORLD HEALTH DAY – HEALTH IS A HUMAN RIGHT

Celebrate World Health Day this National Public Health Week by supporting continued funding for U.S. global health efforts. We are all connected, as the COVID-19 pandemic has shown. Let’s work together to make the world a safer place for everyone.

FRIDAY: ACCESSIBILITY -CLOSING THE HEALTH EQUITY GAP

We can close the health equity gap by reducing health disparities in health insurance, increasing physical accessibility to care, improving availability of appropriate care and building more inclusive public health programs and communities.

SATURDAY: CLIMATE CHANGE – TAKING ACTION FOR HEALTH

Building strong communities makes them more resilient. Communities with greater cohesion have better health outcomes after climate-related disasters. Addressing climate change alongside other inequities, like racial injustice, helps improve the health of communities. If we can keep global warming increases below 2 degrees Celsius, we can dramatically improve the health of children born today, for their entire lives. And we know taking action to reduce and halt climate change today will result in fewer disease outbreaks and better mental health worldwide.

SUNDAY: MENTAL WELLNESS – REDEFINING THE MEANING OF HEALTH

Each year, one in five Americans will experience mental illness. Mental health is public health. Prevention, early detection, and treatment of mental health conditions can lead to improved physical and community health.

To learn more about National Public Health Week, visit www.nphw.org. For more information about local public health efforts, check out our website at www.faycohd.org and follow us on Facebook!

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By Leigh Cannon, MPH

FCPH Deputy Health Commissioner