FCPH spotlights men’s health awareness


The Record-Herald



Last Friday, Fayette County Public Health staff wore blue as part of a nationwide effort to spread awareness of issues affecting men’s health and to promote and encourage well checks for men. Pictured (left-to-right): Heidi Phipps, Donna Butler, and Janessa Williamson, RN

Last Friday, Fayette County Public Health staff wore blue as part of a nationwide effort to spread awareness of issues affecting men’s health and to promote and encourage well checks for men. Pictured (left-to-right): Heidi Phipps, Donna Butler, and Janessa Williamson, RN


Courtesy photos

Pictured (left-to-right) front row: Amy Friel, RN, and Kris Wright, RN, back row: Scherika Brinson, S.I.T. and Tonda Bradley, RN, DON.


Courtesy photos

June is National Men’s Health Month and although the end of June is here, men’s health remains important.

National Today explains on its website, www.nationaltoday.com, “this month is all about encouraging the men in your life (including you, men out there) to take care of their bodies by eating right, exercising, and working to prevent disease. The official symbol for the month is a blue ribbon and the purpose of Men’s Health Month is to heighten the awareness of preventable health problems and encourage early detection and treatment of diseases including cancer, heart disease, and depression.”

According to Fayette County Public Health (FCPH), “Our Reproductive Health and Wellness team supports men’s health year-round by providing wellness checks for men, testicular and prostate exams, STD testing, condom distribution, and referrals to appropriate resources as needed.”

FCPH asks, “did you know:”

—one in eight men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during his lifetime.

—Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in American men, behind only skin cancer.

—Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in American men, behind only lung cancer.

—About one man in 41 will die of prostate cancer.

Prostate cancer can be a serious disease, but most men diagnosed with prostate cancer don’t die from it, according to FCPH. Early screening and detection are key.

Tips provided by National Today for Men’s health includes tweaking diets by cutting back on alcohol or uptaking an intake of healthy, fermented foods like sauerkraut, setting health goals for the month such as losing weight or gaining muscle—or even something simple like eating more vegtables, and getting educated.

“Take this opportunity to read about the common health issues that are specific to men and how you can prevent yourself from getting hurt,” explains the National Today website.

For more information, or to schedule an appointment with FCPH, call 740-335-5910.

Reach journalist Jennifer Woods at 740-313-0355.

Last Friday, Fayette County Public Health staff wore blue as part of a nationwide effort to spread awareness of issues affecting men’s health and to promote and encourage well checks for men. Pictured (left-to-right): Heidi Phipps, Donna Butler, and Janessa Williamson, RN
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2021/06/web1_photo1.jpgLast Friday, Fayette County Public Health staff wore blue as part of a nationwide effort to spread awareness of issues affecting men’s health and to promote and encourage well checks for men. Pictured (left-to-right): Heidi Phipps, Donna Butler, and Janessa Williamson, RN Courtesy photos

Pictured (left-to-right) front row: Amy Friel, RN, and Kris Wright, RN, back row: Scherika Brinson, S.I.T. and Tonda Bradley, RN, DON.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2021/06/web1_photo2.jpgPictured (left-to-right) front row: Amy Friel, RN, and Kris Wright, RN, back row: Scherika Brinson, S.I.T. and Tonda Bradley, RN, DON. Courtesy photos

The Record-Herald