St. Catherine’s clear of COVID-19


Nursing home officials report all active cases have been resolved

The Record-Herald



St. Catherine’s Manor of Washington Court House staff members at the wall to where the “red zone” section of the facility used to be following a COVID-19 outbreak.

St. Catherine’s Manor of Washington Court House staff members at the wall to where the “red zone” section of the facility used to be following a COVID-19 outbreak.


Courtesy photo

All active COVID-19 cases at St. Catherine’s Manor of Washington Court House have been resolved, according to nursing home officials.

On Aug. 25, St. Catherine’s reported that three residents — two females and one male in their 70s — suffered COVID-19 related deaths, and that 11 other residents and three employees had tested positive for COVID. All were laboratory-confirmed cases.

After discovering the spread of COVID-19, the St. Catherine’s care community quickly put full isolation protocols into place for those residents, according to officials. This included isolating a section of the facility into a “red zone,” which required staff to follow strict PPE (personal protective equipment) protocols to ensure the safety of themselves, the residents, and to reduce the risk of further exposure or spread of the virus.

This area of St. Catherine’s is now open and no longer under the red zone operational requirements.

“We are so thankful for our dedicated staff and appreciate all they have done to keep exposure at a minimum and care for those affected by this virus,” said Sue Thomas, administrator at St. Catherine’s. “We are also grateful for the patience family members have had through fighting this virus, and appreciate the trust they all place in us to care for their loved ones.

“At St. Catherine’s Manor of Washington Court House, the health and safety of our residents and staff is always our top concern and priority. We continue to follow the Centers for Disease Control, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, and State and Local Department of Health guidelines.

“We want to assure those we serve and their loved ones that our organization has well-established infection control protocols, the proper personal protective equipment on hand, and we are experienced in dealing with communicable diseases, like the flu and pneumonia virus, that cause respiratory symptoms like this COVID-19. We also continue to monitor all residents and employees daily of any COVID-19 symptoms, including temperature checks, and have the most up-to-date protocols in place to take the appropriate steps to limit exposure if symptoms arise.”

Fayette County Public Health (FCPH) reported Monday that 35 new COVID-19 cases were confirmed over the weekend, bringing the total of actively ill county residents to 67. As of Monday, there were 170 Fayette County residents in isolation or quarantine as a result of COVID-19, according to FCPH. There were eight individuals in the hospital.

FCPH Deputy Health Commissioner Leigh Cannon emphasized the importance of following quarantine protocols if you are identified as a close contact.

“If you are asked to quarantine, I cannot stress enough that it is important to stay in quarantine for the full length of time, which is 14 days from the last date of contact with a positive COVID-19 case,” Cannon said. “People have said that they feel fine, and they want to get tested so they can leave quarantine, but you cannot test your way out of quarantine. It can take 2-14 days after you have been exposed for symptoms to appear and if you are tested too early it may result in a false negative.”

St. Catherine’s Manor of Washington Court House staff members at the wall to where the “red zone” section of the facility used to be following a COVID-19 outbreak.
https://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2020/10/web1_st-catherines.jpgSt. Catherine’s Manor of Washington Court House staff members at the wall to where the “red zone” section of the facility used to be following a COVID-19 outbreak. Courtesy photo
Nursing home officials report all active cases have been resolved

The Record-Herald