What’s in your Easter basket?


By Pat Brinkman - OSU Extension



Easter is the second biggest candy holiday in the United States, as more than 85% of Americans will share chocolate and candy as part of their celebration this year.

What is in an Easter basket? Here are some of the most popular items:

– 87% who make Easter baskets share chocolate or candy in them

· Chocolate bunnies and/or eggs make up 47%

· Jellybeans – 19%

· Candy-coated eggs – 17%

· Marshmallow candy – 12%

· Other – 5%.

– Peeps – more than 1.5 billion consumed each spring. Usually at the top of the most popular Easter treat

– Non-edible items such as stuffed animals, markers, crayons, books, etc.is 79%

All this candy adds up to a lot of sugar!

With all that candy being sold, maybe it is time to rethink the Easter basket. Especially, since the USDA Dietary Guidelines recommends no more than 10% of our calories per day should come from added sugars. These recommendations are for everyone from children to senior adults. Maybe, it’s time we cut back on the amount of candy we buy.

What other options are there to put in the basket besides candy? Some suggestions to fill a basket include:

– Stuffed animals

– Markers, crayons, sidewalk chalk, water paints

– Reading or coloring books, sticker books

– Outside play equipment – jump ropes, balls, noodles for the pool, Frisbees, swim goggles, beach toys

– Bubbles and big wands for making bubbles

– Family board games

– Flip flops

– New reusable water bottle

– Passes to do fun activities

– Religious items

One or two small candy items are fine. Healthy food items could include snack packs of nuts, dried fruits, small boxes of raisins, and trail mix.

Do some fun activities together as a family, such as coloring eggs or having an egg hunt using plastic eggs. These are popular activities as well as great things to do together.

Pat Brinkman is the OSU Extension Educator for Fayette County.

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By Pat Brinkman

OSU Extension