FCS starts school with historical event


Fayette Christian School began the 2017-2018 school year on Monday and marked the occasion by experiencing the solar eclipse.

The school purchased glasses early in the summer and began preparation for making the most of this uncommon occurrence. Many parents, grandparents and alumni joined the students and staff to watch the event.

“I have always read about the different eclipses in our books at school, but I can honestly say that I never thought I would have the opportunity of being able to see one in person,” said McKenzie Riley, one of this year’s seniors. “This is a memory that I will remember for a lifetime, especially because it happened on my senior year of high school.”

During in-service, teachers attended a workshop on the eclipse and instructions were given for safe viewing. On Monday, prior to the beginning of the eclipse, Elizabeth Fitch, the secondary science teacher, showed the students a PowerPoint presentation to refresh their understanding of the eclipse and why one doesn’t happen every month. Afterwards, the student body went out to see the sun for themselves.

“The safety of our students was a major concern,” said Fitch. “We had extra help with our youngest students and used paper plates to surround the eyeglasses. And each seventh to 12th grader was instructed not only to be careful themselves but also to help watch that we all were careful.”

In fact, the kindergartners had been instructed so strongly not to look up at the sun without using their glasses that several walked to recess with their eyes to the ground, avoiding any possible contact with the sun.

Julie Peterson, the librarian, made a pinhole viewing box and passed it around to anyone who wanted to see how that process worked. Many enjoyed trying to capture the eclipse on film, filtering the light through the lens of the eclipse glasses.

“I thought it was amazing to watch,” Patti Sheeter, the K-3 teacher, said. “I loved that several families joined their students. I thought having 90 percent totality, it would be rather dark outside, so I was surprised by how bright just 10 percent of the sun could be.”

Even though they had watched animation of the eclipse and saw how it appeared differently in other parts of the country, students were still awed to see it happen. As the moon approached its highest coverage, they also were able to see the crescent shadows forming under the trees. Though a total eclipse was not viewable, they felt the noticeable drop in temperature and saw a lessening of the sun’s glare.

“It was amazing how the weather changed from quite hot to cooler as more of the sun was covered,” commented Rebekah Elder, the kindergarten aide.

Aaron Turner, another FCS senior, exclaimed, “It was by far one of the coolest things I’ve ever seen. I love nature and to see things in nature, so that was just phenomenal. I find it so cool that God created ‘the greater light to rule the day, and the lesser light to rule the night’ with just words. I’m so looking forward to the eclipse in 2024.”

From the science department: “We’re already looking forward to watching the eclipse in 2024. The path of totality will pass very close to Washington Court House; we may have to plan a road trip to watch the next one.”

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The Fayette Christian School started classes for the 2017-18 school year on Monday by enjoying the Great American Eclipse together with teachers, parents and friends. Mrs. Richmond’s first grade class looks at the eclipse. The paper plates around the glasses gave added protection.
http://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2017/08/web1_20170821_135940.jpgThe Fayette Christian School started classes for the 2017-18 school year on Monday by enjoying the Great American Eclipse together with teachers, parents and friends. Mrs. Richmond’s first grade class looks at the eclipse. The paper plates around the glasses gave added protection.

Submitted article