A conversation in the community with Washington Court House police officer Trent Curl


A conversation with WCH police officer Trent Curl

By Ashley Bunton - abunton@civitasmedia.com



Police officer Trent Curl has been working with the Washington Court House Police Department for a little over a year now.


Ashley Bunton | Record-Herald

A conversation in the community with Washington Police Department officer, Trent Curl.

Hometown: I kind of grew up in a military family, so I’ve lived in California, Chicago, and then eventually moved back to Ohio. My parents are originally from Sabina. My dad joined the military so we moved around a bit.

Employment: Curl is employed as a police officer at the Washington Court House Police Department, where he has worked for just over a year now. He is also in the Navy Reserve. Prior to working as a police officer, he filled in as a dispatcher for the police department until he got into the Ohio State Highway Patrol Academy for police officer training.

Where did you go to school?

I went to the Ohio State Highway Patrol Academy up in Columbus most recently. I’ve done a few college things here and there.

What brought you to Washington Court House?

Family. After my dad retired, he was getting ready to retire, I was 18 and I had to make a decision so, we were living in Chicago at the time, and I decided I would join the military and went into the reserves and moved back here with them.

What do you think of the community now that you’ve been here?

I enjoy this community. I don’t know a whole lot of people. This job definitely helps me to get to know quite a bit of people. I’m here for my family for the most part but as I progress in this job, I meet more and more people. I enjoy the people in the community.

Has anything surprised you about your job here in Washington Court House?

I knew it was going to be tedious, especially the paperwork side. I’m not the best at paperwork but I am learning.

What do you mean by tedious—like filling out the incident reports?

Yes. A lot goes into making sure everything is correct. So for me I think that has been the most difficult for me.

Is there anything that you’ve seen that has kind of surprised you, where you’re like, wow, I never thought I’d have something like that come up?

Not necessarily. I’m more used to the big cities. I guess I grew up in San Diego and Chicago and a lot of things happen that I’ve seen. I guess just seeing an overdose for the first time is probably most surprising, actually seeing it in person, but I’d heard of it.

So you are basically first responders too, sometimes you get a call and then you’re the first ones there, from what I understand, so you probably see quite a bit. Is that something you see every day now?

Yes that’s correct. As far as overdoses, they’re frequent. Some days I won’t particularly see one but they’re often enough.

What do you see your role as being as police officer in the community?

I definitely see myself as a caring type of officer. I strive to make the connection with the community to let them know that we’re just people, too, and I’m trying to do my best to have the community in a way that I wouldn’t mind for my kids growing up. That’s one of my biggest drives for being in law enforcement, is I want my kids to grow up in the best environment possible and I want the same thing for everyone else’s children.

Do you have kids here?

Yes, I have two. My daughter is seven and my son, he’ll be turning five in a couple of days. They both attend Cherry Hill.

When you’re not working, what do you do around here?

Oh, just chasing the kids around. Doing everything I can with them. We like to go camping and doing outdoor stuff. Even as simple as staying home and playing with the kids. Spending time with family is my biggest driving point in my life.

This article is part of an ongoing Record-Herald series, Conversations in Communities, that will focus on bringing local and diverse voices to the front pages. This is the second of several interviews with the newest members of the Washington Police Department. Follow the Record-Herald online at www.recordherald.com and on Twitter @recordherald to see more conversations in the community.

Police officer Trent Curl has been working with the Washington Court House Police Department for a little over a year now.
http://www.recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2017/03/web1_TrentCurl1-1.jpgPolice officer Trent Curl has been working with the Washington Court House Police Department for a little over a year now. Ashley Bunton | Record-Herald
A conversation with WCH police officer Trent Curl

By Ashley Bunton

abunton@civitasmedia.com

Reach Ashley at (740) 313-0355 or on Twitter @ashbunton

Reach Ashley at (740) 313-0355 or on Twitter @ashbunton