The history of Logtown


Submitted by Clarabelle (Jones) Yelletts - Great-granddaughter of Samuel Jones



In thinking of the various settlements that once were in Fayette County, I think about Logtown. Much of the younger generation has never heard of the Logtown settlement, but it did exist.

My great-grandfather Samuel Jones, born in Montgomery County, Ky. in the year 1814, came to Ohio, Fayette County, in the year 1867 with his wife Polly Hisel and family. After living in Wayne Township on Good Hope Road, he moved to the Logtown settlement, where he died March 24, 1889.

One of his sons, Spencer Jones, my grandfather, born 1853 in Clark County, Ky., also came to Ohio. He married a Sophia Wilson in 1883 and they lived in Logtown where they raised 10 children. One of his sons was Lawrence Jones, my father, born May 26, 1903 and died July 12, 1985 in Washington C.H.

None of the original Jones descendants live in Logtown now.

The following is a brief history of the Logtown settlement taken from B. E. Kelley’s book, “Down Through the Golden Years” (1974).

“When Washington C.H. was still a village a little settlement sprang up on the east side of Devalon Rd. at the point where the B. & O. Railroad crosses that road. Since most of the little houses were built of logs, the tiny village, consisting of half dozen or more houses, was given the name of ‘Log town’ and at one time it was more or less famous as a not-to-desirable place in which to live.

“However, with the years the log houses vanished, and frame houses were built, so that at the present time there is not a single log house in the place unless it is covered with weather boarding. And it is now quiet a little suburb.

“Some of the residents dislike the name of Logtown, and while the place is still frequently referred to in that way, there is no longer any particular reason for the name.

“The little place contains eight or ten houses and has one street, or road which extends eastward for some 200 yards and northward about 150 yards, to a dead-end.”

Submitted by Clarabelle (Jones) Yelletts

Great-granddaughter of Samuel Jones